Stats Announcement #2: FOPL Analyses of Ontario Public Library Data 1999-2010

In last week’s post we provided you with a Primer on Library Data by Dr. Robert Molyneux. This week we’re providing you with a a data sheet with an orientation to the data. As mentioned last week, the data for those years give us a good picture of these libraries over the period and by excluding the 1999 and 2000 data, we have eliminated a number of inconsistent data for this preliminary analysis. This report is a summary of the changes over time (2001-2010) of cardholders, population, materials and expenditures, and circulation (including per capita). Select Variables from Ontario Public Libraries, 2001-2010, All Reporting EACH Year FOPL Data Report, Week 1 FOPL_Report_1_Selected_Variables_2001-2010 (1) (2 page PDF) More reports will arrive for full FOPL members every Wednesday on this FOPL.ca website blog and your e-mail inbox! For more information contact Stephen Abram, executive director of FOPL at sabram@fopl.ca....

Stats Announcement #1: FOPL Analyses of Ontario Public Library Data 1999-2010

FOPL has embarked on an exciting project. For the first time this year, the Ministry of Culture, Tourism and Sport has released the Ontario Public Library Data Collection as an open data file from 1999-2010.  The next two years will be released as open data in December. Therefore, for the first time, we have access to these data to perform analyses over time and compare libraries performance.  These data can now be used as management and insight tools for our community. In the coming weeks, we will be releasing some of the data in ‘buckets’ for your reading. Our consultant on this project is Dr. Robert Molyneux (often referred to as Dr. Data!) who is a PhD and MLS with great depth in library statistics.  He has been involved in many of the most important library data sets globally – including NCLIS, IMLS, ARL, and NCES, among others. We thought that the best way to start off this process was to provide you with a primer on library statistics and these data.  Please read this and you will be better prepared to read the coming weeks’ reports. Here is a link to:  A Primer on Library Data Robert E. Molyneux, MSLS, PhD Primer (3) (7 page PDF) The purpose of this series of reports is to present the results of analysis of aspects of Ontario’s public libraries using the data from the Ministry of Tourism, Culture, and Sport. The goal is twofold: to present these results of this analysis in order both provide an initial assessment of Ontario’s public libraries and through these results to solicit comments and suggestions to improve and focus future...

FOPL RFP Released: 2015 Public Opinion Survey about Public Libraries in Ontario

Attached please find a Request for Proposal for a public opinion poll of Ontarian’s usage and attitudes towards public libraries in Ontario – supporting documents also provided. Due: November 28, 2014   Questions: by November 14, 2014 FOPL Opinion Survey RFP – 2014.10.15 Sample from 2010: Market_Probe_Final Report_2010 (1) Please direct your queries to admin@fopl.ca or the contact provided: Stephen Abram Executive Director Federation of Ontario Public Libraries c/o North York Central Library 5120 Yonge Street Toronto, ON M2N 5N9 Tel: (416) 395-0746 Fax: (416) 395-0743 Cel: (416) 669-4855 Email: sabram@fopl.ca Website: www.fopl.ca More information about FOPL see our web site at:...

5 reasons you should have a library card

5 reasons you should have a library card Via: http://searchresearch1.blogspot.ca/2014/10/5-reasons-you-should-have-library-card.html “One of the more powerful research tools you can have is a library card. A library card is instant access to a world of resources. Both offline AND online.   That might surprise you, but here are 5 reasons why you want a library card to be a great researcher. Access to online paywall content. My local library gives paywall access to Ancestry.com, Morningstar, online journals, and more.  It also provides Hoopla video (https://www.hoopladigital.com/ for downloads, and many free music downloads (lots of popular music, some of which really surprised me—this is free?  Yes!).  It also provides many different database services:  a small listing includes, Academic Onefile (journals, magazines, books, audio – great subject browser), InfoTrac (news and periodical.Updated daily.)  Can filter by type, sort by date.  General One File  and MasterFile Complete (EBSCO).  Many libraries have all this, and more. eBooks. Yes, just like physical books, many libraries support borrowing ebooks and e-magazines, typically with time restrictions on how long you can keep them, and sometimes twitchy software, but free’s free—I’ve read many books that I knew I only wanted for a short time. Local archives. Many libraries have archival content that’s never going to make it online (at least in our lifetimes). If you’re doing research on a particular location, visiting physically is often the best thing to do.  But if you can’t get there, checking out the online library can often lead to content that you won’t be able to find via search engines.  (Go figure.  For some reason, many local libraries have put great content online, but then...

FOPL Member Discounts: iSchool Symposium “Building an Engaged Flat Army for the Library”

Special discounts for FOPL members  SAVE THE DATE One of our key challenges in this century is organizing our libraries to innovate, change and succeed.  Recent research shows we have a way to go to adapt our organizations structures and cultures for the 21st Century. U of T iSchool Symposium in partnership with Dysart & Jones Associates November 13-14, 2014 http://www.doitourselvesfuture.com  Building an Engaged Flat Army for the Library Are our libraries organized for the 21st Century? Do we have modern strategies for change? Are our innovation cultures ready for the world of constant technology and societal changing expectations?  Do you want to learn about innovation in public sector organization design, discuss and explore opportunities with peers? If these questions challenge your management team, then this is the symposium for you to explore new ways to develop our organizations to address our future challenges. Innovation and change are keys to success today as the world and its inhabitants continue to evolve and behave in different ways.  This event focuses on creating innovative attitudes, the intra-preneurial and entrepreneurial spirit, and start-up mindsets.  It discusses building competencies and structures that support these types of change and development. Libraries are all about creating connected and engaged organizations and communities; however, they are often challenged in doing just that.  Using models and tools from Dan Pontrefract’s new book, Flat Army, you will be more confident in overcoming resistance to change in your library and building a culture of collaboration and engagement. A copy of the book is included in the registration of the first 50 registrants. Filled with research on skills and competencies and...