“122 Things” you will be able to do in the library of the future that you can’t do today

“122 Things” you will be able to do in the library of the future that you can’t do today http://www.futuristspeaker.com/business-trends/122-things-you-will-be-able-to-do-in-the-library-of-the-future-that-you-cant-do-today/?nocache=1 “What should libraries be? “How will we describe the nature of libraries in the future? Should they be: Baby friendly Pet friendly Food friendly Beer, wine, and alcohol friendly Event friendly Party friendly (should they provide a list of approved catering companies) Homeless friendly Privacy advocate friendly Business friendly Casual user friendly Should they have facilities for: Traveling museum exhibits Private meetings Aerobic reading Taking a shower Preparing and serving food Taking a nap Storing personal items Sending money or making payments Traditional Information Archive – Over the years libraries have expanded their collections. Certainly not all are large enough to manage every items on this list, but most have a majority of them. Print books Digital books Audio books Newspapers Magazines Music Movies TV shows Radio broadcasts Presentations Courseware Audio materials (discs, tapes, talking books and other recorded formats) Maps Microforms Videos (film, television broadcasts, DVDs) Sheet music Photographs, posters, prints, and drawings Apps and mobile apps Social media archives Artwork Non-Traditional Archives Libraries also have an obligation to archive their local communities. Some of the non-traditional archives may include: 1. History of every business in region. 2. Overview of every graduating class in every school. 3. History of local infrastructure including bridges, tunnels, waterlines, sewer lines, fire stations, water towers, police stations, schools, etc. 4. Aging of the community done through sequential photo queues. 5. The sound of the city in the form of audio recordings over the years. 6. Cultural influence timelines. 7. Local archive for...

A recent study of the economic benefits of the Ottawa Public Library (OPL)

Check out the Benefits! A recent study of the economic benefits of the Ottawa Public Library (OPL) shows that Ottawans receive $5.17 in benefits for every $1 invested in the library system. www.biblioottawalibrary.ca/impact *** Bilan des retombées! Selon une récente étude sur les retombées économiques de la Bibliothèque publique d’Ottawa (BPO), les Ottaviens bénéficient de retombées économiques de 5,17 $ pour chaque dollar investi dans le réseau de la Bibliothèque.https://biblioottawalibrary.ca/fr/impact Podcast en francais: http://uniquefm.ca/infos-unique/la-bibliotheque-dottawa-stimule-leconomie-25474 Study says Ottawa Public Library generated 417 per cent return on investment in 2015 Study says Ottawa Public Library generated 417 per cent return on investment in 2015 “In addition to the study, OPL developed an interactive website at http://biblioottawalibrary.ca/impactwhere residents can view how benefits accrue at OPL. A summary report, a full technical report, and the dataset of all data used in the study, are also available on the website. The economic benefit study is the first part of an Economic Benefit and Social Impact Study. Phase two will explore social impacts, examining the broader impact of library services on the community in Ottawa. Phase two is anticipated to be released in 2018.” https://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/impact The Ottawa Public Library vision is to build community and transform lives.  As a valued community resource, how well we perform at realizing this vision involves analyzing more than traditional metrics such as library usage and operational efficiency.  It means measuring the impact the OPL is making for the citizens of Ottawa.   I am pleased to share with you the results of a study to analyze the economic benefits of the Ottawa Public Library.  The study used a methodology developed...

Public Lending Right Program of the Canada Council of the Arts

FYI – Via Sandra Singh at Vancouver PL: FOPL Colleagues and Members Last week, VPL hosted a visit with Peter Schneider, Manager of the Public Lending Right Program of the Canada Council of the Arts. As a quick reminder: The Canada Council for the Arts distributes annual payments to Canadian authors through the Public Lending Right (PLR) Program as compensation for the free public access to their books in Canadian public libraries. This is an indirect but still important support for public libraries. One of the things he spoke about was the ongoing need to get the word out to creators about the program. As you know, PLR compensates people for the presence of their book in public libraries. People who may be eligible are: an author or co-author; an illustrator or photographer; a translator; an anthology contributor; an editor with an original written contribution. There are some other criteria that are outlined at: http://www.plr-dpp.ca/PLR/eligibility/default.aspx One of the things he has noted would be very helpful is if we – as libraries – could let potential writers know about PLR in our workshops for writers, illustrators, etc. about PLR. Authors published through traditional means are often familiar with PLR. Self-published authors are less likely to be familiar. The key points are: how to register for an ISBN (books must have an ISBN) and also what PLR is and where to go to find about PLR. ISBN: http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/services/isbn-canada/pages/isbn-canada.aspx PLR website: http://www.plr-dpp.ca/plr/default.aspx PLR is now also including eBooks in their sampling. And also indie/self-published authors are eligible. Thanks for considering asking your staff to include this information in any workshops. Sandra...

2016 Ontario Public Library Service Awards Short List Nominees Announced

2016 Ontario Public Library Service Awards Short List Nominees Announced From the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport: The 2016 short list nominees for the Minister’s Award for Innovation and the Angus Mowat Award of Excellence are: Brighton Public Library Tech Help One on One Brighton Public Library’s Tech Help One on One project responds directly to an illustrated need for more focused, cost effective Tech Help for community members. The first iteration of this program was made possible through OLCF, and has continued in a modified format ever since. This program empowers individuals to develop skills necessary for participation in the ever changing digital world through half hour Tech Help One on One sessions in a comfortable and supportive environment. Brighton Public Library provides approximately 200 half hour sessions to community members annually. Burlington Public Library BookArts Program Burlington Public Library’s BookArts program offers customers the opportunity to learn the art of bookbinding and creating bound books. The project began as part of our makerspace initiative in 2015. The library’s goal was to provide the community with the skills to bind and create their own books, but the project has turned into much more. Along with workshops to promote book making skills for hobbyists and entrepreneurs, the library provides open studio time for individual creation, the opportunity for community members to share their skills and give back to other community residents and for all participants to socialize in a supportive environment. Community-Led Youth Service Model Burlington Public Library’s community-led model is transforming how teens interact with the library. Moving from a top down model, the library has...