The Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport has published the 2015 Ontario Public Library Statistics to the provincial government’s Open Data website

The Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport has published the 2015 Ontario Public Library Statistics to the provincial government’s Open Data website:   https://www.ontario.ca/data/ontario-public-library-statistics  (MS Excel) A provincial level Summary and Comparison Report is attached for your use.  This is useful to see trends in data between 2014 and 2015.    2015 Ontario Library Statistics Summary Comparison All public libraries have been sent copies of statistics for their population range and can request additional sets from Adam and me, should they need the next population size up or down.   These are in “Accessible Excel” format and no longer in pdf format as the latter was not considered to be Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) compliant. We are working with our Communications Branch to post the 2015 Ontario Public Library Statistics standard reports to the Ministry website in Accessible Excel format and that should be complete in January.   We plan to re-post back-years as well. Let us know if questions, thanks Rod Rod Sawyer Library Services Adviser Culture Services Unit, Programs and Services Branch Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport 401 Bay Street, 17th floor Toronto, ON M7A 0A7 telephone:  416 314-7627 fax: 416 212-1802 email: rod.sawyer@ontario.ca Ontario public library statistics Self-reported data from approximately 380 public libraries, First Nation public libraries and contracting organizations. Self-reported data from approximately 380 public libraries, First Nation public libraries and contracting organizations. The data includes: general information including address financial information holdings information staffing information facilities information activities information including typical week data partnership information (2011 onwards) Data from 2011 and onwards is from a refreshed database.  New fields were added for: provincial funding...

There Has Never Been a More Important Time to Join FOPL

Non-Members of FOPL will receive this letter this week.  We welcome you as members! Dec. 14, 2016 Dear Potential FOPL Member: This letter is to ask for your support and membership as an investment in the collective success of public libraries in Ontario.  We need you as members and participants in FOPL! NOW, more than ever before, is the time to support collaborative efforts in the Ontario public library community.  Why?  As you’re likely aware, the Ontario government is conducting a thorough provincial public library funding review.  This is likely to last at least 24 months and your voice must be at the table.  As a former OLA president once said, “If you’re not at the table, then you’re the dessert.”  This review encompasses the PLOG (provincial library operating grant), pay equity support, connectivity and technology funding, research and innovation funding, the funding for our agencies OLA, SOLS and OLS-North and more!  We all derive great benefit from this funding both individually and collectively and so do our communities! I have served you as the Executive Director of FOPL for over three years supporting our board’s leadership on issues important to you.  During this period we have invested our members’ fees in building support for just such a review.  We have our library statistics in order; we have a large collection of modern public library impact studies; we have supported several qualitative studies through the Ontario Library Capacity Fund; we have an up-to-date public library attitudes and opinion poll; we have an emerging marketing campaign and tagline; we’ve built strong collaborative relationships between FOPL and OLA, SOLS, OLS-North, and...

Ontario Trillium Foundation (OTF) releases 5 regional reports: “A Profile of Wellbeing”

Includes libraries as a marker of wellbeing.   Ontario Trillium Foundation (OTF) released  “A Profile of Wellbeing” five detailed reports of community wellbeing for the North, West, East, and Central regions, and for the city of Toronto. This is the second time the Ontario Trillium Foundation has commissioned the Canadian Index of Wellbeing to help answer the question, “How are we really doing?” The CIW uses research to determine whether Canadians are making progress towards sustainable wellbeing in eight inter-connected domains, or categories – Health, Living Standards, Community Vitality, Environment, Leisure and Culture, Education, Time Use, and Democratic Engagement. As a public agency, the Ontario Trillium Foundation wants to ensure we are directing our resources to where there is the most need, so that we can have the greatest impact. We wanted to take an evidence-based approach, so that we could demonstrate the value of our investments.  Using an index like the Canadian Index of Wellbeing allows us to make granting decisions that will make the biggest positive change to individuals and to communities. Watch OTF’s CIW explainer video: How are we really doing? RESOURCES: A Profile of Wellbeing in Ontario The North Region The West Region The East Region The Central Region Toronto Backgrounder & Quick Facts The Ontario Regional Reports contain information about crime rates, access to physicians, greenhouse gas emissions, stress rates, and commute times. That is why OTF used the Index in the creation of our Action Areas – the areas in which OTF focuses its investments. As OTF accumulates more data, these reports in tandem with other sources will help establish the best measure for OTF’s accumulated impact over the next decade. “The Ontario Trillium...

Discussion Paper for Members on the Public Library Funding Review

As you are no doubt aware, the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport released the First Culture Strategy in Ontario this year.  It contains a large number of recommendations including this specific recommendation: “Goal 2: Strengthen culture in communities, Strategy 1: Help build strong community-based culture organizations: Review and update provincial funding programs for public libraries to build the capacity of libraries serving rural and remote communities, improve digital services and support leadership and innovation.” We have been working on our members’ and communities’ behalf for a few months meeting with Ministry staff and creating the frameworks for a healthy and productive discussion with the review team. We now have a Discussion Document created by a strong collaboration within Ontario’s library community.  Represented in this discussion paper were writing and review teams from: Federation of Ontario Public Libraries (FOPL) Ontario Library Association (OLA and including its divisions: the Ontario Public Library Association (OPLA) and the Ontario Library Boards Association (OLBA)) Chief Executives of Large Urban Public Libraries (CELUPL) Administrators of Medium-sized Public Libraries of Ontario (AMPLO) Administrators of Rural and Urban Public Libraries of Ontario (ARUPLO) Canadian Urban Libraries Council (CULC) In consultation with: Southern Ontario Library Service (SOLS) Ontario Library Service – North (OLS-North) The goal of our sector is to speak with one voice about our recommendations as a public library community. We support ongoing consultation and engagement with the public library community and municipalities. This discussion paper presents principles for consideration and discussion in response to the recommendation in The Ontario Culture Strategy – Telling our stories, growing our economy (2016). At this point we are not taking...