1st  Notice of 2018 FOPL Annual General Meeting

  Issued November 30th, 2017 1st  Notice of 2018 Annual General Meeting The Annual General Meeting of the Federation of Ontario Public Libraries will take place at the at OLA Super Conference Metro Toronto Convention Centre, Toronto  on Thursday, February 1st, 2018 – 4:00 p.m. Registration opens – 3:30 p.m Location: TBD The complete agenda package with attachments will also be posted and updated on www.fopl.ca The Annual General Meeting (AGM) will take place on the opening day of the Ontario Library Association Super Conference 2016.  The order of business will include: Receipt of 2018 AGM AGENDA Receipt of Reports – FOPL Chair and Executive Director Receipt of Treasurer’s Report, 2017 Financial Statements and Auditor’s Report Including Approval of Auditors for the Year (ending October 31, 2018) Approval of 2017 AGM Minutes Receipt of Reports of Working Groups and CELUPL  Indigenous Library Partnerships Working Group  Marketing and Communications Advisory Working Group  Government Relations Working Group  Library Provincial People Capacity Working Group CELUPL Approval of Proposed Resolutions Nominations and Elections to the Board for 2016, TBC Other Business [A limited number of Board documents will be available at the AGM. As they are received they will be loaded on to our FOPL website here for downloading – http://fopl.ca/committeestask-forces/board-of-directors-2/] Vacancies: 2018 will see vacant positions on the FOPL Board up for election.   Large Urban Caucus CEO Rose Vespa   Francophone Caucus Trustee TBD Rural Caucus Trustee TBD Submission of Resolutions Resolutions shall be prepared and submitted to the Board no later than January 8th 2018. Resolutions, other than resolutions proposed by the Board, may not exceed 200 words in length, and shall be signed by the presiding officer and the secretary of the submitting body. Members, Associate...

Data Shows Barrier to Visitation Is Offsite Technology (Not Onsite Technology)

This post is an important read. While the author is primarily addressing museums, much of what she says can apply to public libraries, especially with our focus on makerspaces and the tendency to reach for the next shiny thing. If our focus is to get more people into our institutions, we have to make it easy for them to learn what we have to offer through our online presence. Data Shows Barrier to Visitation Is Offsite Technology (Not Onsite Technology) Data Shows Barrier to Visitation Is Offsite Technology (Not Onsite Technology) “Onsite technology (virtual reality and techy exhibits) sound cool, but data suggest that inadequate offsite technology (ticketing platforms and social media) is a primary reason why many people do not visit cultural organizations. Cultural organizations are doing technology wrong. Or, more accurately, they may not be focusing on their most immediate tech-based opportunities to inspire and support visitation. When it comes to onsite technology – such as virtual reality, techy exhibits, and mobile apps – cultural entities (and museums in particular) are generally enthusiastic and chatty. These initiatives are the basis of many industry conference sessions, and they often make the news as creative, tech-based initiatives launch. Offsite technology – such as allowing for quick and easy online ticketing, adequate use of social media, or having a mobile website – doesn’t often make the headlines. It certainly don’t sound as sexy as innovative onsite tech exhibits! These things are so fundamental to baseline operations in the 21stCentury that perhaps cultural entities should have long ago prioritized and mastered them… …and, yet, many organizations haven’t. Onsite technology is certainly...

Cities need to love libraries

Cities need to love libraries https://www.forabettertoronto.ca/ideas/cities-need-to-love-libraries “Whether it be in the U.S., NFLD or here in Toronto Libraries have key role to play in the 21st century: Libraries contribute to a healthy democracy by helping people hone their marketable skills and digital competencies. For millions, libraries are the only source of computers access for living and working in a digital world. Literacy and intelligence are linked. Literate populace ask more of themselves and their governments. “The very existence of libraries affords the best evidence that we may yet have hope for the future of man”. T.S. Eliot. Importantly libraries are evolving. Well run they should not fall prey to the inevitable future new disrupters. Libraries have gone from a place for reading books and looking up facts to a place where one can learn skills and engage in new experiences. From a quiet thinking place to a vibrant community hub. Go into a modern library today, like the ones at the Scarborough Civic Centre or the new one on Albion road and you will hardly recognize today’s library. Yes, they still contain lots of books, but they also include numerous computer stations, tablets, 3D printers, media rooms, video game collections, etc. As a Harvard University study said, “every library should figure out what they want to be and just do that”. And that’s what the good library systems are doing. Today a new or revitalized library can dramatically help civic renewal.”...

Release of Building Better Lives: Ontario’s Long-Term Infrastructure Plan 2017

Dear Sir or Madam: I am pleased to inform you of the release of Building Better Lives: Ontario’s Long-Term Infrastructure Plan 2017. This plan responds to the changing needs of Ontario’s communities and sets forth a vision for Ontario’s long- term infrastructure planning and delivery. This plan outlines important policy commitments in areas that matter to Ontarians. In this era of accelerated technological change where internet connection is ever more critical to business and communities, we need to focus on improving access to broadband infrastructure and building resilient and substantive infrastructure. Ontario is also integrating climate change considerations into infrastructure planning to ensure environmental sustainability as well as linking infrastructure investments to social policy initiatives such as community benefits projects and apprenticeships that support more jobs and training opportunities. To further advance community goals, the province’s commitment to a new Social Purpose Real Estate strategy will ensure the broader community need is taken into consideration in infrastructure planning and public property decision-making. Finally, this plan summarizes Ontario’s first-ever Asset Inventory that includes a description of the condition, age and value of Ontario’s assets by sectors. The Infrastructure for Jobs and Prosperity Act, 2015 mandates the Government of Ontario to develop a long-term infrastructure plan by May 2019. This plan represents an interim step towards meeting the full requirements of the act and demonstrates Ontario’s commitment to long-term, strategic, evidence-based public infrastructure planning and delivery. To read more about Ontario’s 2017 Long-Term Infrastructure Plan, please visit www.ontario.ca/document/building-better-lives-ontarios-long-term-infrastructure-plan-2017 and www.ontario.ca/document/building-better-lives-ontarios-long-term-infrastructure-plan-2017/technical-appendix-assessing-ontarios-existing-infrastructure for more information. As we work towards fulfilling the policy commitments outlined in the plan and meeting our legislative requirements, we welcome comments on this plan....

ONN Action Alert: Tell your Ontario government ministry it must support Bill 148 implementation costs for the nonprofits it funds, starting January 1, 2018

 ONN Action Alert  November 27, 2017                                                        REMINDER: Tell your Ontario government ministry it must support Bill 148 implementation costs for the nonprofits it funds, starting January 1, 2018 Bill 148, the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act has passed!   The Ontario government signalled in its Fall Economic Update that it will work with provincially-funded nonprofits to offset the new labour costs associated with the new legislation. Now, the Ministry of Education has committed to $12.7 million to support the child care sector to cover added costs. It’s time for the other 14+ ministries that have funding agreements with nonprofits to get on board! As Cathy Taylor, ONN’s Executive Director, was quoted in Friday’s Toronto Star: “(The sector) supports the new legislation and the decent work practices it embraces…. We are counting on our funders and on government to think about how they can support those costs.” Great examples of advocacy work for more support The Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario has run an excellent advocacy campaign focused on professional pay and decent work. St. Stephen’s Community House lead advocacy efforts for employment services agencies with a group statement to the Ontario Ministry of Labour supporting decent work and Bill 148. Who this affects and when All nonprofits with paid staff in Ontario could be affected by Bill 148. The minimum wage increase of $14 an hour goes into effect January 1, 2018, with additional provisions in effect April 1, 2018 and...