IFLA Trend Report 2016 Update

The first IFLA Trend Report, released in August 2013, described the forces shaping libraries around the world, and asked the question: how will we access, use, and benefit from information in an increasingly hyper-connected world? The Trend Report is intended to be a starting point for ongoing reflection, analysis, and debate. The report identified five top-level trends that will shape the information ecosystem: New Technologies will both expand and limit who has access to information. Online Education will democratize and disrupt global learning. The boundaries of privacy and data protection will be redefined. Hyper-connected societies will listen to and empower new voices and groups. The global information environment will be transformed by new technologies. Between 2013 and 2016, the global IFLA community engaged in conversation and  debate about the Trend Report. The IFLA Trend Report 2016 Update shares the results of these conversations, and highlights new questions that were just emerging in 2013, such as Blockchain technologies, 3D printing, and the importance of redefining the role of libraries. The IFLA Trend Report 2017 Update brings together the ideas that emerged during the annual President’s Meeting, building on the trends from the 2013 report. It also includes the perspective of the Global Vision discussions, which were initiated in April 2017, and have engaged thousands of librarians from across the globe to discuss how a united library field can tackle the changes in our world.   WHAT IS THE IFLA TREND REPORT? In the global information environment, time moves quickly and there’s an abundance of commentators trying to keep up. With each new technological development, a new report emerges assessing its impact on different sectors of society....

The 2016 Ontario Public Library Statistics have been published and are now available on the Ontario Open Data website

FOPL plans to have our annual report on Ontario public and First Nation Libraries performance ready by OLA Super Conference.  Custom reports can be ordered right after that! Dear public library and First Nation public library CEOs, and lead contacts, We are happy to inform you that the 2016 Ontario Public Library Statistics have been published and are now available for viewing on the Ontario Open Data website here: https://www.ontario.ca/data/ontario-public-library-statistics Also, coming in January 2018, you will be able to view 2015 and 2016 Ontario Public Library Statistics Standard Reports organized by population group on the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport website at the following link: http://www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/libraries/statistics.shtml If you have any questions regarding the Ontario Public Library Statistics, please free to contact program lead staff Rod Sawyer (rod.sawyer@ontario.ca) or Adam Haviaras (adam.haviaras@ontario.ca). Thank you Sincerely, <original signed by> Chris Schiller Manager, Program Planning and Delivery Unit Programs and Services Branch, Culture Division Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport Avis aux directeurs généraux et aux personnes-ressources responsables de bibliothèques publiques, Nous sommes heureux de vous informer que les statistiques sur les bibliothèques publiques de l’Ontario de 2016 sont diffusées et maintenant accessibles à partir du site Données ouvertes de la province ici : www.ontario.ca/fr/donnees/statistiques-sur-les-bibliotheques-publiques-de-lontario De plus, à partir de janvier 2018, vous pourrez également consulter des rapports types sur les statistiques relatives aux bibliothèques publiques de l’Ontario pour 2015 et 2016, classés par groupe de population, sur le site Web du ministère du Tourisme, de la Culture et du Sport au lien suivant : http://www.mtc.gov.on.ca/fr/libraries/statistics.shtml Si vous avez des questions au sujet des statistiques sur les bibliothèques publiques de l’Ontario, veuillez...

Ten Reasons Libraries Are Still Better Than the Internet

Ten Reasons Libraries Are Still Better Than the Internet After Dawn Finch Ten Reasons Libraries Are Still Better Than the Internet Ten Reasons Libraries Are Still Better Than the Internet “Thanks to the internet, we no longer need libraries or librarians.” You most likely hear some variation on that theme pretty regularly. Sixteen years ago, American Libraries published Mark Y. Herring’s essay “Ten Reasons Why the Internet Is No Substitute for a Library” (April 2001). Technology has improved exponentially since then—social media didn’t even exist yet. But even the smartest phone’s intelligence is limited by paywalls, Twitter trolls, fake news, and other hazards of online life. Here are 10 reasons why libraries are still better than the internet. Libraries are safer spaces. The internet brings people together, often in enjoyable and productive ways, such as over shared interests (pop culture blogs, fanfic sites) or common challenges (online support groups). But cyberbullying and trolling can leave people reluctant to engage with folks they disagree with or to share their ideas in the first place. Libraries are places where people can gather constructively and all are welcome. Libraries respect history. Web pages are ephemeral, and link rot is a real problem. The content of library collections is much more stable. Printed materials are generally published on acid-free paper, which will not disintegrate. And librarians are leading the way to bring similar stability to the web through services like the Internet Archive and perma.cc. Librarians digitize influential primary sources. While looking at historical artifacts is valuable, repeated physical handling can damage them. Making digital versions of important works available online—as in the...