Webinar: Indigenous Literatures, Social Justice, and the Decolonial Library

Join Us For a Live 60-Minute Presentation This webinar is a paid sponsorship opportunity. The products, services, and opinions presented herein do not constitute a Choice, ACRL, or ALA endorsement of any kind. Tuesday, August 21, 2018 2:00 PM Eastern 1:00 PM Central 12:00 PM Mountain 11:00 AM Pacific REGISTER HOME UPCOMING ARCHIVE CONTACT CHOICE PODCAST Indigenous Literatures, Social Justice, and the Decolonial Library The work of Indigenous writers is increasingly influential in and beyond the literary world, from recognition through prominent literary prizes like the Governor General’s Literary Award and the Griffin Prize to major film and theatre adaptations and collaborations, and from participation in resource extraction protest to activism around cultural appropriation and violence against Indigenous women and girls. Yet many librarians remain unsure of how best to engage Indigenous literatures and knowledge in ways that are both robust and respectful. This webinar will reflect on the settler-colonial legacies of libraries in North America while considering a model of the justice-centred “decolonial library” and its significance to Indigenous and settler readers alike. REGISTER PRESENTERS Daniel Heath Justice Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture University of British Columbia Daniel Heath Justice (Cherokee Nation) holds the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture at the University of British Columbia, on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territories of the Musqueam people. He is widely published as a scholar and creative writer, and his most recent book is Why Indigenous Literatures Matter (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2018). SPONSORED BY Founded in 1974, Wilfrid Laurier University Press publishes books in the social sciences and humanities, with specializations in...

The Canadian Urban Libraries Council (CULC) responded to Tor.com’s decision to impose a four month embargo

The Canadian Urban Libraries Council (CULC) responded to Tor.com’s decision to impose a four month embargo on selling new Tor ebooks to libraries. CULC/CBUC sent letters to both Fritz Foy, President and publisher; and Tom Doherty, Chairman, of Tor Books about the publisher’s four month embargo on selling new Tor ebooks to libraries. The letters are available here: CULC-CBUC Letter to Fitz Foy at Tor about eBooks CULC-CBUC Letter to Tom Doherty at Tor about eBooks Updated: Tor Books is Now Windowing Library eBooks Updated: Tor Books is Now Windowing Library eBooks...

What is the difference in cost between Amazon and Libraries?

  Should We Replace Libraries with Amazon? https://medium.com/@EveryLibrary/should-we-replace-libraries-with-amazon-3f67782dca94 Jeff Bezos and Amazon in 1999 Of course not. It’s a terrible idea. So why did Forbes publish this article that made that horrendous suggestion? We have no idea, but that’s just the kind of sentiment that we’re fighting against in the United States with your donations. There are, of course, many problems with this idea. First of all, libraries cost the average American taxpayer over 18 years old just $4.50 per month. An Amazon Prime subscription alone is nearly double that price and you get very little for free with that subscription because you still have to buy books or pay more to gain access to premium goods or services. If you want audio books or eBooks on Amazon, you need to pay for an Audible subscription or Kindle unlimited ($10 a month or twice the cost of a library) but you can get that for free through Overdrive (Libby) at your local library. If you want newly released movies, you have to buy the premium Amazon channels or you can get those for free at your library. If you want access to premium music you have to pay another $7.99 a month on Amazon or you can use Freegal or Hoopla at your library for free. And, if you want magazines, you can just get those for free from your library with Zinio or PressReader. But those are just some examples of the physical things available at your library. The truth is that libraries have been a whole lot more for a long time. Libraries are community spaces where children come...

New Library of Parliament Backgrounders

The Library of Parliament has released a number of research publications on topics of interest to the library and IM community, including: – Freedom of Expression and Hate Speech – Cybersecurity – Artificial Intelligence – Federal Legislation affecting People with Disabilities Recent Library of Parliament Research...