Guidelines for Library Services to Individuals with Dyslexia

Guidelines for Library Services to Individuals with Dyslexia http://www.alsc.ala.org/blog/2018/08/guidelines-for-library-services-to-individuals-with-dyslexia/ “The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) has published a revised and extended version of their Guidelines for Library Services to Persons with Dyslexia.  IFLA’s guidelines are intended as a tool for both trained and less experienced library staff members who are responsible for serving those with reading and learning difficulties.” “Here is a brief look at some of their recommendations: Public libraries and school libraries, along with librarians and teachers, can collaborate more to support children and teens with print disabilities by sharing resources and promoting each other services and collections. Libraries can use labels to connect books in print and in other format. For example, use a label ‘audio book also in the library’ to indicate that another format is available for checkout besides just the printed book. Encourage children and young people borrow both formats together so they can practice their reading skills by reading and listening at the same time. Offer extended loan periods to allow children more time to read library material. Provide magnifying reading rulers at the desk for in-library use. These help readers with learning differences additional support in reading by magnifying text with an added reading line. Provide awareness training to library staff with reminders to staff members that every child, young person and adult has the right to read and enjoy books.” “Looking to build your own background knowledge in dyslexia and other learning differences? Check out ASCLA’s Library Accessibility Tipsheet on Learning Differences. This tipsheet defines key terms, shares tips for working with those individuals with reading and learning differences, and provides...

Sheet Music: Stanford Libraries Scanning Project Makes Piano Works Available (Public Domain)

“Sheet Music: Stanford Libraries Scanning Project Makes Piano Works Available (Public Domain) Via  Gary Price From the Stanford Libraries Blog: A pilot project in the Music Library to digitize sheet music and make images available in the SearchWorks catalog has produced its first collection, made up of 140 piano arrangements and transcriptions. Basic records for these items have long been in SearchWorks, and are now greatly enhanced with access to the digital images and options for close examination and download. This collection was chosen for scanning because the paper is too brittle to withstand the handling that results from practice and performance. The works are also in the public domain, making free, printable, digital files the ideal means of access and preservation. The original paper will be stored at SAL3. [Clip] The scanning pilot project tested Goobi software and its interaction with the Argo administrative system at our satellite location. Goobi is open-source software that facilitates large-scale digital projects. Goobi manages image upload and processing steps including ordering of pages, cropping, deskewing, and quality control checks. Goobi works in concert with Argo, the administrative system for managing content in the Stanford Digital Repository, to upload images to the Depository and link them with their metadata. Direct to Digital Collection: Piano Arrangements and Transcriptions (via Stanford SearchWorks Catalog) Learn MUCH More About the Collection and the Digitization Process, View...

How Libraries can Compete with the Rising of Free (and subscription) eBooks

How Libraries can Compete with the Rising of Free eBooks How Libraries can Compete with the Rising of Free eBooks 1. Make users aware of the common pitfalls and dangers of downloading eBooks online 2. Curate the selection 3. Live events 4. Offer a browsing experience with selected literary goods in the library or online 5. Create an inviting space 6. Promote your ebooks and digital subscriptions  ...

 Ontario Launches Online Survey – “Planning for Prosperity: A Consultation for the People”  

 Ontario Launches Online Survey – “Planning for Prosperity: A Consultation for the People” Wednesday, the Ontario Government announced the details of the public consultation component of its comprehensive review of government spending. What is the purpose of this consultation? As part of its review, the Government is looking for feedback from the public on their experience with government services and programs, what they expect from their government, and how these can be improved or streamlined. This feedback is expected to help the government deliver on several key priorities that lie at the heart of its review of government spending, namely: Reducing the burden on taxpayers Restoring accountability and trust in Ontario’s public finances Creating jobs and ensuring economic prosperity Maintaining and improving hospitals, schools and other vital public services What kind of insight is the government looking for? Through its online survey, the government is seeking public feedback on eight areas of major government investment and programming: 1.      Children’s and Social Services 2.      Education 3.      Environment and Resources 4.      Economic Development 5.      General Government and Other Services 6.      Health 7.      Justice 8.      Postsecondary and Training Much of the survey is multiple choice with ranked options. However, respondents are invited to provide limited written feedback on specific ideas or recommendations. While respondents are free to offer whatever such feedback they choose, the government has identified a number of priority goals that will undoubtedly shape how suggestions and input from the public is evaluated. These are well-aligned to the government’s mandate of reining in spending as it works towards eliminating the deficit and returning to a balanced budget: Improving existing programs and services Closing out programs and services that are...