How Canadian Readers Discover and Obtain Books, New Data From BookNet Canada Leisure Study

How Canadian Readers Discover and Obtain Books, New Data From BookNet Canada Leisure Study https://www.infodocket.com/2019/04/12/how-canadian-readers-discover-and-obtain-books-new-data-from-booknet-canada-leisure-study/ Via Gary Price at LJ InfoDocket “From a BookNet Canada Blog Post by Shimona Hirchberg: Who are this year’s readers? The majority of readers surveyed identify as female, are partnered, are parents, and work full-time with a household income between $25,000 and $50,000. Most readers live in cities or urban areas (48%), followed by suburban areas (32%). Over half of all readers have at least one child (53%) and 37% have children living at home. Adults living with partners make up 29% of readers, while 19% live alone, 8% live with a roommate(s), and 7% are empty nesters. Almost a quarter of readers are between 25 and 34 years old (23%), closely followed by the 35- to 44-year-old age bracket (22%), and those 55 to 64 years old (20%). [Clip] How Canadian Readers Acquire Books Where do readers acquire most of their books? Does it differ depending on the book format? Short answer: Yes. Longer answer: Readers mostly acquire print books from the library (27%), physical bookstores (21%), or an online retailer (18%). They also get books from “someone else” (16%) — maybe family, friends, or that coworker who keeps pushing A Game of Thrones on everyone. Readers mostly acquire ebooks from an online retailer or app (36%), from a website offering free downloads (24%), the library (21%), or a subscription service (12%). For audiobooks, readers mostly acquire them from the library (24%), a subscription service (22%), a website offering free downloads (18%), or an online retailer (11%). Read the Complete Blog Post Including data (and infographic) on how Canadians discovery books...

Call for working group volunteers to develop best practices re: ethical issues in cataloguing

Dear CFLA-FCAB Members, Please share this call for interest with your networks. Please note, this is a grassroots call for working group participation and that it is not required to have nominations from your association. Deadline is May 6, 2019. ———– Chers membres de la FCAB-CFLA, S.V.P., partager cet appel d’intérêt parmi vos réseaux. Veuillez noter qu’il s’agit d’un appel au niveau communautaire pour participer à un groupe de travail et qu’il n’est pas nécessaire que votre association propose des nominations. La date limite est le 6 mai 2019. Katherine McColgan, CAE Executive Director — Directrice générale Canadian Federation of Library Associations Fédération canadienne des associations de bibliothèques 75 rue Jolicoeur, Gatineau QC, J8Y 1A8 613.867.7789 www.cfla-fcab.ca @CFLAFCAB @kdmccolgan CFLA-FCAB recognizes the Algonquin peoples as the traditional custodians of the land in which our office is located. La FCAB-CFLA reconnaît les Algonquins comme les gardiens traditionnels des terres dans lesquelles se trouve notre secrétariat. From: canadian-technical-services-network@googlegroups.com <canadian-technical-services-network@googlegroups.com> On Behalf Of May Chan Sent: April 15, 2019 11:34 AM To: Canadian Technical Services Network <canadian-technical-services-network@googlegroups.com> Subject: Call for working group volunteers to develop best practices re: ethical issues in cataloguing Dear Colleagues, In response to the need for specific ethical guidance for catalogers and metadata creators, and at the direction of the Cataloging and Metadata Management Section (CaMMS) of the American Library Association in cooperation with the Cataloguing and Indexing Group (CIG) of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals and the Cataloguing and Metadata Standards Committee (CMSC) of the Canadian Federation of Library Associations, the Ethics in Cataloging Steering Committee is extending a call for volunteers in order to form working groups...

Facts: Inter-library Loan Services in Canadian Provinces and Territories.

Costs are free to the user, generally absorbed by the province/territory NB. Ontario provincial support ended April 26, 2019. Yukon: https://yukon.ca/en/arts-and-culture/libraries-and-archives/request-purchase-or-interlibrary-loan   Nunavut: http://www.publiclibraries.nu.ca/prog_ill.html  Northwest Territories: http://www.nwtpls.gov.nt.ca/BorrowByMail.html  British Columbia: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/education/administration/community-partnerships/libraries/bc_interlibrary_loan_code.pdf  Alberta  –       Supports ILL –       Materials sent through a provincial courier service –       https://www.alberta.ca/public-library-network-interlibrary-loan.aspx –       http://www.municipalaffairs.alberta.ca/documents/libraries/2015_Resource_Sharing_Policy.pdf Manitoba: https://www.gov.mb.ca/chc/pls/pdf/librarystandardsguidelines_e_web.pdf  Saskatchewan: https://saskatoonlibrary.ca/interlibrary-loans Quebec  –       Supports ILL through BAnQ –       Materials sent through post or occasionally a courier service –       No charge to Quebec public libraries to use ILL provided they are members of BAnQ –       http://www.banq.qc.ca/services/peb/peb_bibliotheques/ –       http://www.banq.qc.ca/a_propos_banq/mission_lois_reglements/lois_reglements_politiques/politiques_procedures/reglement_admin_peb/index.html#annexe1 New Brunswick: https://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/nbpl/interlibrary.html  Some libraries charge a lending fee for interlibrary loans. You will only be billed if you accept the charge beforehand. Fees can be paid at your local library when the item is picked up. Nova Scotia: https://www.halifaxpubliclibraries.ca/about/library-policies/interlibrary-loan-policy/ Prince Edward Island: https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/service/request-interlibrary-loan Newfoundland: https://www.nlpl.ca/use-the-library/inter-library-loans.html...