Can Old Buildings Be Turned Into Libraries? A Sneak Peek Into an Upcoming Open Access Book by IFLA’s Environment, Sustainability and Libraries Special Interest Group (ENSULIB)

Can Old Buildings Be Turned Into Libraries? A Sneak Peek Into an Upcoming Open Access Book by IFLA’s Environment, Sustainability and Libraries Special Interest Group (ENSULIB) Via Gary Price at LJ InfoDocket https://www.infodocket.com/2020/08/07/can-old-buildings-be-turned-into-libraries-a-sneak-peek-into-an-upcoming-open-access-book-by-iflas-environment-sustainability-and-libraries-special-interest-group-ensulib/ “From the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA): The book titled “New Libraries in Old Buildings: The Creative Reuse of Disused Structures” and edited by Petra Hauke, Karen Latimer and Robert Niess, will be published in 2020. Stay tuned! Sustainability and environmental awareness are key issues globally, with the library world committed to playing its part in protecting the planet. Implementing sustainable strategies is now well established in many libraries. The new book will be published in open access by De Gruyter and is made possible through the collaboration between ENSULIB and IFLA’s Library Buildings and Equipment Section (LBES). It takes sustainability one step further and shows how sensitively transforming existing historic buildings into exciting, functional and beautiful libraries is both a challenge and a highly fulfilling undertaking. [Clip] A wide range of creative adaptations are discussed including barns, a courtyard, churches, factories, fire stations, a grocery store, a hospital, locomotive halls, a post office, a cattle market and a slaughterhouse. Read the Complete...

Strategic Planning Horizon Assumption: The coronavirus is never going away

The Atlantic: The coronavirus is never going away This pandemic was once counted in weeks, then months; now we measure time in seasons, and hope that doesn’t slip into years. Today, we recap three things we learned this week while covering the pandemic—and look ahead to what you can expect as the weather turns cold. Three Things We Learned 1. The outbreak may worsen come winter. That’s when the cold will bring many indoors. “We know that the biggest risk of spread for this virus is when meaningful numbers of people gather indoors for any extended period of time,” one expert told Joe Pinsker. 2. Immunology is central to the pandemic’s biggest mysteries. Understanding it is key. “Which is unfortunate because, you see, the immune system is very complicated,” Ed Yong, who also wrote one of our latest cover stories, explains. 3. Even after this is all over, the coronavirus will likely stick around. “We will probably be living with this virus for the rest of our lives,” our Science reporter Sarah Zhang warns. “In fact, virologists have wondered whether the common-cold also got their start as a pandemic, before settling in as routine viruses.” One question, answered: Will Americans ever go back to working full-time in offices again? With the pandemic closing workspaces, the internet, Derek Thompson reports, “seems poised to weaken the spatial relationship between work and home.” When the pandemic is over, one in six workers is projected to continue working from home or co-working at least two days a week, according to a recent survey by economists at Harvard Business School. Another survey of hiring managers by the global freelancing platform Upwork...