Addition of a new feature to Ontario’s Newborn Bundle Service

Hello, The Government of Canada and the Province of Ontario have recently launched a “Referral Service” as part of ServiceOntario’s online Birth Registration Service to support parents of newborn children in learning about and beginning the process of opening a registered education savings plan (RESP), and requesting the Canada Learning Bond (CLB) for their eligible children. The “Referral Service” allows new parents to consent to be contacted by the promoter of their choice to open an RESP and request the CLB for their child. Money saved in an RESP can be used to help pay for education expenses at a trade school, college, university, or apprenticeship program. No personal contributions are required for an eligible child to receive the CLB. Community-based organizations in Ontario can encourage parents of newborn children to use the service to get help to open an RESP and request the CLB for their children. Building on Budget 2017 measures, the Government of Canada allocated $500,000 to work with the Province of Ontario to make it easier for parents to start saving earlier for their children’s education after high school, by presenting educational savings options at the time a baby’s birth is registered. For more information, please refer to the attached Backgrounder as well as the related news release at the following address: Government of Canada partners with the Government of Ontario to add a new feature to the province’s Newborn Bundle Service.     Pierre Labbée Gestionnaire, Programme canadien pour l’épargne-études Emploi et Développement social Canada ( 819-624-7647 + pierre.labbee@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca   Manager, Canada Education Savings Program Employment and Social Development Canada ( 819-624-7647 + pierre.labbee@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca...

Blogs for Programming Librarians

Blogs for Programming Librarians http://programminglibrarian.org/articles/best-blogs-programming-librarians “As a programming librarian, it can be hard to consistently provide creative, original ideas for your patrons (you can only host so many book talks, right?). But there’s a simple solution for librarians seeking support and inspiration: the blogosphere.” 5 Minute Librarian Bacon’s favorite librarian blogs: RA for All, Super Library Marketing and YA Books and More Hafuboti Her favorite librarian blogs: Bryce Don’t Play, Tales for the Tiny and Jbrary The Neighborhood Librarian Her favorite librarian blogs: Bryce Don’t Play, Hi, Miss Julie, At the Intersection, Fat Girl Reading and Hafuboti Teen librarians Ontarian Librarian Her favorite librarian blog: Jbrary  Hi, Miss Julie Her favorite librarian blogs: Fuse #8, Bookshelves of Doom, Stacked, JBrary, Bryce Don’t Play and At the Intersection The Loudmouth Librarian Her favorite librarian blogs: Oregon Young Adult Network, Teen Librarian Toolbox, Teen Services Underground and Jbrary  Children’s librarians Jbrary Their favorite librarian blogs: Mel’s Desk, Storytime Katie, the ALSC Blog, Ontarian Librarian, Tales for the Tiny and The Lego Librarian The Show Me Librarian Her favorite librarian blogs: Bryce Don’t Play, Hi, Miss Julie and Library Makers Thrive after Three...

Merger of Canadian Research Knowledge Network and Canadiana.org

“Merger of Canadian Research Knowledge Network and Canadiana.org https://www.crkn-rcdr.ca/en/crkn-and-canadianaorg-merge-combined-organization The Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) and Canadiana.org merged operations earlier this month: “Merger discussions began in June, 2016 in recognition of a changed research environment and with the goal of building on the strengths and complementary activities of two of Canada’s most impactful content-based national organizations serving Canada’s digital research infrastructure. This merger allows CRKN and Canadiana to cohesively pursue a united and coordinated strategy that is envisioned and directed by member libraries, and works in partnership with research and memory institutions, funders, and other partners, broadening and expanding Canada’s vision and impact in digital scholarship.” CKRN is a partnership of Canadian universities that undertakes large-scale content acquisition and licensing initiatives to help its member institutions. Canadiana.org is a not-for-profit, charitable organization made up of public libraries, archives, research institutions, and other organizations committed to digitizing, preserving, and providing access to Canada’s documentary heritage. The press release announcing the merger provides some “quick facts”: CRKN has worked with Canadiana since 2006 to provide subscription access to the Early Canadiana Online (ECO) collection, which is a large collection of full-text historical content about Canada, including books, magazines and government documents. Currently, 54 CRKN members have subscriptions to Canadiana Online or the ECO collection. CRKN members provide the bulk of Canadiana’s funding through subscriptions and membership fees. In 2013, CRKN and Canadiana collaborated on the Heritage Project, a 10-year initiative to digitize and make accessible online some of Canada’s most popular archival collections encompassing roughly 40 million pages of primary-source documents. This project was funded by 46 CRKN members. The merger...

Cross Canada Consultations on the Copyright Review Update — Le point sur les consultations pancanadiennes sur l’examen du droit d’auteur

Messasge bilingue –Bilingual message Dear CFLA members, As you may have heard, on March 29, 2018, the INDU committee officially launched its consultation process. See the Press Release here:http://www.ourcommons.ca/DocumentViewer/en/42-1/INDU/news-release/9752040. The consultations are expected to be completed in early 2019. The Government is also now accepting Brief submissions which can be done online http://www.ourcommons.ca/Committees/en/INDU/StudyActivity?studyActivityId=9897131 or directly to the Committee Clerk at indu@parl.gc.ca. Cross-country consultations Although we do not have any more detail on the timing (still believed to be May) and government process for the cross-country consultations, we wanted to reach out to you today to provide you more information of what CFLA’s role will be to support you in these consultations.  1)      Talking points: The CFLA-FCAB Copyright Committee has been working over the last several months and continues to work to develop positions statements relating to various parts of the Copyright Act that affect libraries. These statements will be sent to you in advance in order to provide you with background information on each of the subjects. 2)      Coordination: In order to get the broadest representation possible; both from within the library community as well as with the content delivered, we will work with you to ensure that the library community will be well represented at each of the cities visited, and to ensure the committee has an opportunity to hear about a wide range of topics related to the Copyright Act that drive an educated and informed Canadian population. 3)      Support: Many of you will have experience in advocacy activities and know the subject matter well. There may, however, be those who would benefit from a briefing or...

FOPL & OLA Election Toolkit coming week of April 23rd!

We’ll have the toolkit live likely the week of the 23rd of April. Please share the outline of the toolkit and the below draft of the “key questions” that we will be using with your staff and Boards.:   OUTLINE PT 1 – ONTARIO ELECTION 2018: COMMUNICATING THE VALUE OF LIBRARIES OLA & FOPL’s ELECTION KEY MESSAGES IMPORTANT GUIDELINES TO ENSURE SUCCESS ENGAGING DURING ELECTIONS APPENDIX A – HOW DOES THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT IMPACT ONTARIO’S LIBRARIES? APPENDIX C – TEMPLATES PT 2 – SUPPORTING CIVIC ENGAGEMENT AT YOUR LIBRARY: HOST AN ALL CANDIDATES FORUM ENCOURAGE NON-PARTISAN VOTER ENGAGEMENT ENGAGING STUDENTS AT UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGES ENGAGING STUDENTS AT SCHOOL LIBRARIES   KEY QUESTIONS These reflect the issues identified in OLA & FOPL’s Ontario Libraries Election Brief. Public libraries continue to serve more members of the community and evolve to meet changing needs, but provincial base funding for public libraries has been frozen for over 20 years. This year, public and First Nations libraries received a much-needed increase of $17 million to their annual provincial base funding. This investment is vital for ensuring that our libraries – in rural communities, small towns and cities like – are sustainably funded. Do you support maintaining this critically important provincial funding for public and First Nations libraries? Access to online resources is an increasingly important part of the mix of services that public and schools libraries provide. Ensuring that students and the public have equitable access to accurate, comprehensive online resources is more important than ever with the growing presence of misinformation, questionable sources and “fake news”. But these resources are expensive. Ontario is...