Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library and Cultural Centre Hires New CEO

Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library and Cultural Centre Hires New CEO   Bradford West Gwillimbury, November 22, 2019 – The Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library Board is pleased to announce that Matthew Corbett has accepted the position as the Library’s new CEO. Mr. Corbett brings with him progressive management and leadership expertise, a proven track record of success and a passion for providing excellent customer service. As the current CEO of St. Mary’s Public Library and Adult Learning Centre, Mr. Corbett is responsible for the development and delivery of library services including annual and capital budgets, implementing  strategic priorities, conducting a facility feasibility study and executing significant building renovations.  Mr. Corbett has earned a Masters of Information Studies from the University of Western Ontario, and a Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Arts from Laurentian University.  He is a certified Teacher in good standing with the Ontario College of Teachers and also holds an Advanced Leadership and Management Certificate from Mohawk College. “The Board is excited to welcome Matthew, who joins us at a critical point in the Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library’s development,” says Board Chair, Jennifer Harrison. “As we complete the new strategic plan for the next four years, it will be very helpful to have Matthew, with his experience, clear vision and innovative approach, lead that process.” Mr. Corbett will join the Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library as CEO on Wednesday, December 18, 2019. Mr. Corbett will succeed current BWGPL CEO Terri Watman, who is retiring at the end of the year. “It’s wonderful to have Matthew bring his expertise and passion to this Library and the...

‘We Wanted Our Patrons Back’ — Public Libraries Scrap Late Fines To Alleviate Inequity

‘We Wanted Our Patrons Back’ — Public Libraries Scrap Late Fines To Alleviate Inequity https://www.npr.org/2019/11/30/781374759/we-wanted-our-patrons-back-public-libraries-scrap-late-fines-to-alleviate-inequi “A form of social inequity” “Acknowledging these consequences, the American Library Association passed a resolution in January in which it recognizes fines as “a form of social inequity” and calls on libraries nationwide to find a way to eliminate their fines. “Library users with limited income tend to stay away from libraries because they may be afraid of incurring debt,” said Ramiro Salazar, president of the association’s public library division. “It stands to reason these same users will also stay away if they have already incurred a fine simply because they don’t have the money to pay the fine.” Lifting fines has had a surprising dual effect: More patrons are returning to the library, with their late materials in hand. Chicago saw a 240% increase in return of materials within three weeks of implementing its fine-free policy last month. The library system also had 400 more card renewals compared with that time last year.”  ...

The 10-Digit ISBN Is Getting Retired Next Year

The 10-Digit ISBN Is Getting Retired Next Year https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamrowe1/2019/11/29/the-10-digit-isbn-is-getting-retired-next-year/#6c6927524d3e “Every commercially published book in the world is given a unique International Standard Book Number, or ISBN. On its inception in 1967, that number was 10 digits long, though it was updated to 13 digits in 2007. Now, starting in early 2020, the 10-digit ISBN is getting replaced entirely by the 13-digit version for the first time in the US market. The news comes from the Book Industry Study Group’s Metadata Committee, which met earlier this month to discuss the changes. Up until now, any 10-digit ISBN could be updated to a 13-digit version by slapping a “978” onto the front — pick up any commercially published book, and you’ll see the ISBN and barcode somewhere on the cover. Next year, Bowker, which manages US ISBN assignments, plans to add a new “979” prefix in addition to the 978 one. With two prefixes floating around, any systems that still just convert 13-digit ISBNs to 10-digit identifiers will have no way to tell a 978-prefixed ISBN from its 979-prefixed counterpart. And those systems still exist. Some might even opt for a 10-digit number...