New Infectious Disease Emergency Leave Provides Relief to Ontario Employers

New Infectious Disease Emergency Leave Provides Relief to Ontario Employers   Friday, June 5, 2020 By Barry W. Kwasniewski and Luis R. Chacin The Ontario government filed Regulation 228/20, Infectious Disease Emergency Leave (the “Regulation”) under the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (the “ESA”), on May 29, 2020, providing an unpaid job-protected Infectious Disease Emergency Leave to non-unionized employees whose employers have temporarily reduced or eliminated their hours of work. The Regulation provides employers, including charities and not-for-profits (“NFPs”), with temporary relief from the ESA’s provisions regarding termination, severance and constructive dismissal for non-unionized employees, including “assignment employees.” This temporary relief is retroactive to March 1, 2020 and will expire six (6) weeks after the declared emergency ends. Click here to read the full text of the Bulletin from Carters. To discuss how this may impact your charity or not-for-profit, call toll-free at 1-877-942-0001...

OMA Ontario Museum Association: Inclusion 2025: A Practitioner’s Guide to Inclusive Museums

OMA Statement “Institutions need to acknowledge the power structures that exist throughout their organizations. Acknowledgement is a difficult but necessary step towards making the changes that will help to dismantle exclusionary practices and power structures. By reckoning with their own legacies of oppression, museums have the potential to positively disrupt dominant social narratives and spark discussion on issues of access, diversity, inclusion and equity – extending their impact far beyond their physical space. As institutions realize their potential reach, the moral imperative of embodying diversity and inclusion becomes all the more clear. That is, as leaders making a positive impact on the lives of communities and individuals, museums have the power to create empathy, foster dialogue and cross-cultural learning, reduce social and economic barriers that negatively affect well-being, promote understanding and respect, and meet local needs in a way that builds stronger communities.” Inclusion 2025 Need to Know Inclusion 2025: A Practitioner’s Guide to Inclusive Museums Inclusion 2025: A Practitioner’s Guide to Inclusive Museums is one of many components of the Museum Accessibility, Inclusion and Engagement Collaborative (MAIEC) project that was launched in December of 2015 by the OMA, the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion (CCDI). The MAIEC project is our response to the challenge we posed to the broader museum community in the 2016 Conference, and a recognition of the needs we face as a sector to do better, and continue doing better, in truly being inclusive to the communities we serve. Read the full guide and...

Legal Information vs Legal Advice

Legal Information vs Legal Advice https://www.webjunction.org/news/webjunction/legal-information-vs-legal-advice.html “Sara Pic, Head of Public Services for the Law Library of Louisiana describes the critical distinction between library staff offering patrons legal information and crossing the legal and ethical line into offering legal advice. Watch this video to learn more about the difference between offering legal information and legal advice. For more on WebJunction and Legal Services Corporation’s training initiative Improving Access to Civil Legal through Public...

Report Finds Massive Drop in Canadians’ Willingness to Disclose Personal Information for Free Online Services

“Report Finds Massive Drop in Canadians’ Willingness to Disclose Personal Information for Free Online Services” Via Gary Price at LJ InfoDocket https://www.infodocket.com/2020/06/05/digital-privacy-report-finds-massive-drop-in-canadians-willingness-to-disclose-personal-information-for-free-online-services/ “From the Canadian Internet  Registration Authority (CIRA): The Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) [recently 5/28] released its 2020 Canadians Deserve a Better Internet Report, which provides an overview of Canadians’ views on key digital and internet policy issues. The report will help inform policy discussions ahead of the Canadian Internet Governance Forum, which has been rescheduled to November 24th and 25th due to COVID-19. Overall, the report shows Canadians growing anxiety about cybersecurity-related issues, including a significant drop in their willingness to disclose personal information for better content and services online. In 2019, 72 per cent of Canadians said they were willing to disclose some or a little personal information in exchange for valuable content or service. Only one year later, with the exception of online banking services, the vast majority of Canadians say they are unwilling to share their personal data in exchange for better online services. Key Findings from Canadian Internet Users: With the exception of online banking services (52%), most Canadians indicate that they are unwilling to share their personal data in exchange for better products and services: 26 per cent for better video streaming services, 23 per cent for social media websites, 6 per cent for digital advertising 15 per cent for internet-connected devices like baby monitors. 83 per cent believe it is important that government data, including the personal information of Canadians, be stored and transmitted in Canada only. 7-in-10 are concerned about potential cybersecurity risks from foreign-owned network technologies like Huawei Technologies. 74 per...