Why Kids Stop Reading for Fun by Age 9 (and What to Do About It) 

Why Kids Stop Reading for Fun by Age 9 (and What to Do About It)  https://offspring.lifehacker.com/why-kids-stop-reading-for-fun-by-age-9-and-what-to-do-1833554143 “A national reading survey by Scholastic reveals something they’re calling the “decline by nine.” According to the report, the percentage of kids defined as frequent readers—those who read books for fun five to seven days a week— drops from 57% among 8-year-olds to 35% among 9-year-olds. Between ages eight and nine, the number of kids who say they love reading plummets from 40% to 28%. What happens during this year, and more importantly, what can parents do to keep their young readers reading, willingly?” Don’t stop reading to your kids once they learn how to read Use the in-between moments Start a book club with your tween Remember that comic books are books See technology as a bridge—not a barrier—to reading Model reading...

New Research from University of Michigan: “Story Time Better with Print Books Than E-Books, Study Suggests”

New Research from University of Michigan: “Story Time Better with Print Books Than E-Books, Study Suggests” Via Gary Price at LJ InfoDocket https://www.infodocket.com/2019/03/26/new-research-from-university-of-michigan-story-time-better-with-print-books-than-e-books-study-suggests/ “From Michigan Health: Picking what book to read isn’t the only choice families now make at story time – they must also decide between the print or electronic version. But traditional print books may have an edge over e-books when it comes to quality time shared between parents and their children, a new study suggests. [Clip] The research, led by University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and involving 37 parent-toddler pairs, found that parents and children verbalized and interacted less with e-books than with print books. The findings appear in journal Pediatrics, which is published by the American Academy of Pediatrics. “Shared reading promotes children’s language development, literacy and bonding with parents. We wanted to learn how electronics might change this experience,” says lead author Tiffany Munzer, M.D., a fellow in developmental behavioral pediatrics at Mott. Read the Complete...

You can now grab a fancy cocktail at the Boston Public Library

You can now grab a fancy cocktail at the Boston Public Library https://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/food-dining/2019/03/19/you-can-now-grab-fancy-cocktail-boston-public-library/ODO2Jg7MC0umgSGtHvdKPL/story.html “Now you can order a cocktail with that free book. The Boston Public Library in Copley Square on Wednesday is opening its revamped Map Room cafe as a tea lounge, complete with bar seating and specialty drinks wittily named after literary greats. The lounge will also serve artisan snacks — including tartines, cheese and charcuterie boards, and desserts — as well as culinary mainstays like soups and salads.”...

CFLA Budget Communique

190322_CFLA-FCAB)Federal_Budget_communique [FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE] Libraries support budget initiatives to improve accessibility, provide new resources for Canadians with print disabilities, and support Indigenous languages March 22, 2019—OTTAWA The Canadian Federation of Library Associations/Fédération canadienne des associations de bibliothèques (CFLA-FCAB) is applauding the federal government’s commitment to invest in equitable library access. CFLA-FCAB had called on the government to make targeted investments that will help libraries provide books in formats that are fully accessible for all Canadians. Measures announced March 19th will help Canada’s library community achieve the long-term goal of universal access to knowledge. “Canadians with print disabilities currently have access to less than 10% of published works and Indigenous communities have less than 5%. This has placed the print disabled community at a disadvantage for far too long,” said Alix-Rae Stefanko, Chair of CFLAFCAB and a youth services librarian at Winnipeg Public Library. “We are very pleased that the government has committed to supporting the production and delivery of accessible formats, this is an important step to creating an inclusive publishing environment in Canada.” The Budget announced $3 million in the current fiscal year would be given to the Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) to produce new accessible reading materials to be made available at Canada’s public libraries. It also committed to a strategy that will support the production and distribution of accessible reading materials through publishing incentives. Canada’s independent publishing industry will receive $22.8 million over 5 years to increase production of accessible books for persons with print disabilities. “We were also pleased to see government’s support for preserving, promoting, and revitalizing Indigenous languages.” added Stefanko “The...

Three Things To Remember When Data Findings Are Difficult To See

This a great opinion piece: Three Things To Remember When Data Findings Are Difficult To See Three Things To Remember When Data Findings Are Difficult To See Intro teaser: “Two interesting things inevitably happen when an organization becomes audience-centric and data-informed: First, happily, an organization starts to get an accurate grasp on the things they do well. As a sector, some of our superpowers include securing public trust, providing academic advantages for children, and creating meaningful moments of connection. This information can result in a terrific boost! Second, less happily, an organization realizes what they haven’t been doing so well. Helpful data shines a light on so-called effective strategies that have actually been hurting the organization long-term – sometimes for years! Being shown with numbers that you’ve been making some bad guesses? That can be empowering, enlightening, invigorating…and very uncomfortable. One of the biggest hold ups for evolution of organizations can be the defenses that arise when data suggests that – for years – an organization has been doing something “wrong.” In some cases, these problems are instinctual, ill-informed “best practices” within the industry (such as misunderstanding how discounting really impacts visitation, or thinking expensive building expansions permanently increase attendance, to name just a couple). In other cases, they’re the result of individual cognitive biases among leaders. One of the most difficult situations an organization may face in the journey to become a data-driven entity is when findings suggest that the solutions that leaders championed for years may be causing more harm than good – and you’re a leader who championed them. To make matters worse, the cut-and-dry nature of charts can make findings feel less like opportunities for growth, and more like personal...