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Fully customizable advocacy training curriculum is now available through Turning the Page: Building Libraries, Strengthening Communities.

Good training for public librarians and FREE. Build advocacy skills and confidence through Turning the Page! A fully customizable advocacy training curriculum is now available through Turning the Page: Building Libraries, Strengthening Communities. Turning the Page: Supporting Libraries, Strengthening Communities PLA is pleased to announce that the advocacy training curriculum Turning the Page: Supporting Libraries, Strengthening Communities is now available at www.PublicLibraryAdvocacy.org. This training curriculum is an updated version of Turning the Page that was developed for library associations and networks around the world, with input from the Public Library Association and other grantees of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Libraries initiative. Turning the Page: Supporting Libraries, Strengthening Communities is a complete training package that includes an Advocacy Training Implementation Guide—a recommended read before diving into the curriculum—and a set of 15 training sessions that each includes a trainer script, PowerPoint presentation, and handouts. An Advocacy Action Plan Workbook accompanies the training so participants can develop an advocacy plan for their library in real-time. All materials are free, and we hope you find them helpful. Anyone is welcome to download and use Turning the Page: Supporting Libraries, Strengthening Communities today; the curriculum and other resources are free to use and share! If you are interested in a more formal training experience, several PLA-trained Turning the Page facilitators are available to help implement the content at your library. All of these facilitators have extensive experience with the Turning the Page content and would bring a dynamic and successful advocacy program to your library. While the content is free and downloadable, we ask that when using the materials, you...

Four Complementary Public Library Metrics Supports

FOPL FOPL can provide customer statistics report and peer comparison on a variety of measurements and metrics based on the Ontario Public Library Data Collection (1998-2015) Ontario Public Library Statistics: Special Reports Service First Nation Indigenous Libraries Statistical Analysis and Peer Comparison FOPL Releases Ontario Public Libraries Statistics Report and Rankings (Feb. 2017)   PLA Public Libraries Association (ALA) About Project Outcome Wherever public libraries are working, possibility lives. Project Outcome is a FREE toolkit designed to help public libraries understand and share the true impact of essential library services and programs by providing simple surveys and an easy-to-use process for measuring and analyzing outcomes. Project Outcome also provides libraries with the resources and training support needed to apply their results and confidently advocate for their library’s future. While many public libraries collect data about their services and programs, what is often lacking are the data to support what good they are providing their communities, such as programs serving childhood literacy, digital and technological training, and workforce development. With Project Outcome, patron attendance and anecdotal success stories are no longer the only way libraries can demonstrate their effectiveness. Developed by library leaders, researchers, and data analysts, Project Outcome is designed to give libraries simple tools and supportive resources to help turn better data into better libraries. Measuring outcomes helps libraries answer the question, “What good did we do?” An outcome is a specific benefit that results from a library service or program. Outcomes can be quantitative or qualitative, and are often expressed as changes that individuals perceive in themselves. Project Outcome helps libraries measure four key patron outcomes—knowledge, confidence, application, and...

North, West, East, and Central regions, and for the city of Toronto. This is the second time the Ontario Trillium Foundation Canadian Index of Wellbeing regional vitality reports

Dear volunteers, For those of you that attended our volunteer conference last month, you will recall having seen the reports and learning about how the Foundation is using this data. Today, OTF released  “A Profile of Wellbeing” five detailed reports of community wellbeing for the North, West, East, and Central regions, and for the city of Toronto. This is the second time the Ontario Trillium Foundation has commissioned the Canadian Index of Wellbeing to help answer the question, “How are we really doing?” The CIW uses research to determine whether Canadians are making progress towards sustainable wellbeing in eight inter-connected domains, or categories – Health, Living Standards, Community Vitality, Environment, Leisure and Culture, Education, Time Use, and Democratic Engagement.   As a public agency, the Ontario Trillium Foundation wants to ensure we are directing our resources to where there is the most need, so that we can have the greatest impact. We wanted to take an evidence-based approach, so that we could demonstrate the value of our investments.  Using an index like the Canadian Index of Wellbeing allows us to make granting decisions that will make the biggest positive change to individuals and to communities. Watch OTF’s CIW explainer video: How are we really doing? RESOURCES: A Profile of Wellbeing in Ontario The North Region The West Region The East Region The Central Region Toronto Backgrounder & Quick Facts The Ontario Regional Reports contain information about crime rates, access to physicians, greenhouse gas emissions, stress rates, and commute times. That is why OTF used the Index in the creation of our Action Areas – the areas in which OTF focuses its investments. As OTF accumulates more data, these reports in...

2017 Ontario Community Hubs Summit Follow Through for Public Libraries

The 2017 Ontario Community Hubs Summit was a success and there was much sharing of insights, thoughts and experiences.  We  were able to learn from and connect with others who are planning and developing community hubs in Ontario. There are a few things that public libraries  can do to help us build on the Summit’s momentum: 1.       Join the Resource Network at communityhubsontario.ca  2.       Do you have any resources you think might be helpful to others?  If so, please share them with us at community.hubs@ontario.ca 3.       If you run or work at a community hub, please add yourself to the Resource Network’s mapping tool.  Visit the site, navigate to the mapping page, and click ‘Add your Hub’ to add your...

If libraries get rid of fines, the benefits may outweigh the losses

Libraries Are Dropping Overdue Fines — But Can They Afford To? If libraries get rid of fines, the benefits may outweigh the losses. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/libraries-are-dropping-overdue-fines-but-can-they-afford-to_us_5913733ae4b0b1fafd0dccc2 “The New York Public Library has joined the growing ranks of public library systems contemplating the end of overdue fines for children, according to a WNYC report. A fifth of NYPL accounts held by children have been blocked due to unpaid fines, but the library president, Tony Marx, would like to motivate kids to be good library users without charging them for failures. “We’ve heard stories of parents saying to their kids, ‘We don’t want you to borrow books because you might be late with them and then you’ll have fines to worry about,’” he told WNYC. In fact, overdue fines can end up keeping thousands of kids from accessing library resources, just because they’re unable to pay what they...

Resources for the Ontario Public Libraries Tagline

  Launch of Ontario Public Libraries Tagline Website: “A Visit Will Get You Thinking” Ontario Public Library Week: October 15 – 21, 2017 http://www.accessola.org/web/OLA/OPLA/Ontario_Public_Library_Week/OLA/OPLA/Ontario_Public_Library_Week.aspx How to use the Branding Tagline and Guidelines. (Now in French and English)   http://www.thinkaboutlibraries.ca/  ...

Thunder Bay libraries now loaning garden tools

Thunder Bay libraries now loaning garden tools Roots to Harvest has opened tool sheds at the Brodie and Waverley branches http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/thunder-bay-library-loans-garden-tools-1.4090093      ...

MTCS will be implementing a one-time $1 million investment in our northern, rural and Indigenous libraries

Dear valued colleague and partner, In the 10 months since assuming the Tourism, Culture and Sport portfolio, I have had the opportunity to travel the province to meet with artists, arts workers, librarians and heritage advocates. You have graciously welcomed me into your theatres and galleries, your studios and on to your film sets. And we have engaged in some wonderful conversations about Ontario’s thriving culture sector. You were not shy about sharing your opinions about our successes, and also areas where we could use some improvement. I have listened carefully to each and every one of you, and that is why it’s my absolute pleasure to share today’s news with you.Earlier today our government released the 2017-18 provincial budget, which brings enhanced investment in the culture sector. The Ontario Arts Council (OAC) will receive a $20 million increase over four years. The Ontario culture sector is growing and it’s important that the OAC keeps pace and I look forward to seeing the  impact that this increased investment will make. I am also pleased to announce that MTCS will be implementing a one-time $1 million investment in our northern, rural and Indigenous libraries. Libraries are the hearts of our communities, and I know that this investment in digital services and connectivity will be welcomed across the province. We’ll have more details to share with you on this program soon. I look forward to working with all of you as we continue to implement Ontario’s Culture Strategy, and ensure that Ontario’s culture sector flourishes. All my best, Eleanor McMahon Minister Post-budget letter to Culture Stakeholders (1)...

Update on Public Library Funding Review/ Mise à jour sur la révision des programmes de financement des bibliothèques publiques

Dear Public Library and First Nation Public Library CEOs, I am writing to update you on the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport’s progress in implementing the Culture Strategy commitments related to public libraries. As you know, the Culture Strategy contains three commitments directly related to public libraries: Review and update the provincial funding programs for public libraries to build the capacity of libraries serving rural and remote communities, improve digital services and support leadership and innovation. Work with First Nation public libraries to better understand their unique needs and identify opportunities for responding through improved supports. Work with government partners and culture stakeholders to maximize the use of public libraries, museums, galleries and other culture facilities as community hubs and explore opportunities to integrate arts and culture activities and spaces into schools and other community facilities. To move forward on these commitments, we have been engaging with sector association representatives through roundtable discussions (see Appendix for participant list). The topics of these meetings include Leadership and Innovation, Community Hubs, Standards and Performance Measurement and Digital Services. Meetings are occurring over spring and summer. Following the roundtable discussions, the Ministry will survey all public libraries to gather more information. This input will help to ensure that future policies and programs are reflective of the needs of Ontario’s diverse library sector. In addition, we have hired a consultant to undertake a needs assessment of First Nation public libraries. This included two regional meetings, individual interviews and an online survey conducted with First Nation public libraries. A final report has been submitted to MTCS and its findings will be shared with...