NEWSROOM

New Data & Infographic: “The Internet and Digital Technology” in Canada”

New Data & Infographic: “The Internet and Digital Technology” in Canada” Via Gary Price at LJ InfoDocket http://www.infodocket.com/2017/11/14/new-data-infographic-the-internet-and-digital-technology-in-canada/ New from Statistics Canada: Just over 90% of Canadians 15 years of age and older went online at least a few times a month in 2016, and it was not just young people checking out the Internet. Some 68% of those 65 years of age and older also used the Internet at least a few times a month. [Clip] The 2016 General Social Survey (GSS), Canadians at Work and Home, allows multi-faceted analyses of today’s issues in a manner not previously possible, providing new and current insights into the lifestyle behaviour of Canadians as they meet the challenges of a changing world. Providing information on diverse subjects such as Internet use, work-life balance, job satisfaction, leisure activities, and their potential interactions, this first analysis showcases a selection of the many topics examined in the 2016 survey. Internet is no longer just for the young Although previous surveys showed that the Internet was used predominantly by the young, the survey Canadians at Work and Home reveals that by 2016 the pattern had changed. Older age groups are making large inroads into the digital world. According to the 2016 GSS, 91% of Canadians aged 15 and older used the Internet at least a few times during the month preceding the survey, up from 86% three years earlier in 2013. While people aged 15 to 44 had similarly high usage rates—generally well over 90% in both years—individuals aged 45 and older increased their Internet use substantially from 2013 to 2016. Most notably, among 65- to 74-year-olds, Internet use rose from 65% to 81%, while among those aged 75 and older usage rose from 35% to 50% over these three years. Internet use varied across the provinces, ranging from 94% in Alberta to 88% in Newfoundland and Labrador...

Library and Archives Canada Opens Location Inside Vancouver Public Library

Library and Archives Canada Opens Location Inside Vancouver Public Library From LAC: To better serve our clients, we have opened a new public service point in Vancouver. You will find us in the iconic Central Library of the Vancouver Public Library, on the 6th floor at 350 West Georgia Street. West Coast residents, do you need help ordering a copy of a historic Canadian photograph held in our collection? Do you want to see your grandfather’s digitized First World War service file? Or do you simply want to learn what Library and Archives Canada’s (LAC) collection is all about? You will now have easier access to LAC reference specialists! We also hold original archival documents created by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada and its predecessor departments in British Columbia and Yukon. You may consult these documents by booking an appointment with our specialists. See Also: Library and Archives Canada Will Begin Providing In-Person Services From Inside Vancouver Public Library Next Year (October 5,...

TV Ontario, Canada – “Our Changing Libraries”

Ontario, Canada – “Our Changing Libraries” The Agenda with Steve Paikin From 3D printers to mental health services, public libraries across the province are evolving to meet a changing society and a digital age. For Ontario Public Library Week, Ontario Hubs presents a round table on the changing role of libraries. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=h5HIWUH95xw...

What do we call the people public libraries have been delegated to serve?

Mary Cavanagh’s blog post, based on her sabbatical research, on: What do we call the people public libraries have been delegated to serve? What are the primary nouns being used by these libraries to refer to the people who access their services? Who do Canadian public libraries serve? “This table summarizes my take on the preferred terms used (one term per category for each [CULC] library system) in each of governance and planning, and these library policies. Governance + Planning # of libraries’ preferred term Conduct + Computer Use Policies # of libraries’ preferred term Customer 24 Customer 19 Patron 10 User 16 Member 4 Patron 6 Clientèle1 3 Member 2 User 3 Client 2 Canadians2″ 1 Lots more in the post and a great resources for further discussion. I’m not on the fence – I prefer ‘member’!...

My IFLA Global Vision campaign

My IFLA Global Vision campaign Dear colleague, You did it! IFLA Global Vision received over 22,000 votes from a total of 213 countries and areas of the world! This is a fantastic response that could not have been achieved without your support. You mobilised your members and your communities to get involved and motivated them to share with their friends and colleagues. This is exactly what a united library field looks like!   Thank you so much. The voting may be over, but the discussion is still ongoing. Please find attached the details of our fun social media campaign, called #MyiflaGlobalVision:https://www.ifla.org/myiflaglobalvision. We hope you will get involved and we ask you to share the attached message with your members and your communities. You will find the attached message translated in the seven IFLA official languages. Select your preferred one and share the news. With kind regards, Gerald Leitner IFLA Secretary General Get involved in #MyiflaGlobalVision An incredible 213 countries and areas of the world voted from ALL continents for the IFLA Global Vision! What’s next? Now, IFLA is analysing all the data and has also launched a fun social media campaign called #MyiflaGlobalVision. Let’s keep the discussion ongoing, until we know the results!   How does it work? The campaign takes the form of a challenge that snowballs across social media. You are being asked:  “What does IFLA Global Vision mean to you? Share your experience. Your thoughts. Your ideas.” It’s quite simple: Sounds great! When can I get involved? Now! Have fun challenging! Find out more and see other people’s...

Released: The Ontario First Nations Public Libraries Needs Assessment Report

Dear First Nation Public Library and Public Library CEOs, As part of Ontario’s plan to strengthen culture and communities across the province, the Ontario Culture Strategy contains an action to work with First Nation Public Libraries (FNPLs) to better understand their unique needs and identify opportunities for responding through improved supports. As part of this work, the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport (MTCS) contracted NVision Insight Group to conduct a Needs Assessment of FNPLs and write a report. I am pleased to now share this report with you. The Ontario First Nations Public Libraries Needs Assessment Report delivers recommendations and outlines the conclusion that FNPLs function as vital community hubs, supporting community literacy and providing First Nation-specific and Indigenous resources to children and youth. Forty FNPLs shared their knowledge and experience during the process, which included group meetings, phone interviews, and an online survey. I would like to thank all of the FNPLs for their invaluable input, and I want to signal our commitment to continuing to work on the important issues raised by the report. The final report delivers recommendations divided into the four following themes: Improve funding structures, formulas and supports Support the management, preservation and revitalization of First Nation languages and cultural resources and programming Improve coordination and advocacy Streamline and simplify reporting processes and expand eligible expenses. As we move forward, MTCS will consider these recommendations as we implement the Culture Strategy commitment to review and update provincial programs for public libraries. We look forward to your continued input into these important activities. Sincerely, Kevin Finnerty Assistant Deputy Minister – Culture Division Ministry of...

All Submissions on Copyright Reform to the Copyright Board of Canada

A Consultation on Options for Reform to the Copyright Board of Canada Some of the information on this Web page has been provided by external sources. The Government of Canada is not responsible for the accuracy, reliability or currency of the information supplied by external sources. Users wishing to rely upon this information should consult directly with the source of the information. Content provided by external sources is not subject to official languages, privacy and accessibility requirements. http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/693.nsf/eng/00162.html List of submissions received ABCDEFGHIJKLM NOPQRSTUVWXYZ A Access Copyright (PDF, 10 pages, 588 KB) Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists (PDF, 4 pages, 492 KB) Artisti (PDF, 11 pages, 370 KB) Association nationale des éditeurs de livres (PDF, 3 pages, 334 KB) Association of Canadian Publishers (PDF, 3 pages, 486 KB) Association québecoise de l’industrie du disque, du Spectacle, et de la vidéo (PDF, 3 pages, 46 KB) B Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright (PDF, 20 pages, 189 KB) C Canadian Alliance of Student Associations (PDF, 3 pages, 452 KB) Canadian Arts Presenting Association (PDF, 3 pages, 573 KB) Canadian Association of Broadcasters (PDF, 16 pages, 1,037 KB) Canadian Association of Research Libraries (PDF, 3 pages, 164 KB) Canadian Association of University Teachers (PDF, 2 pages, 105 KB) Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (PDF, 6 pages, 135 KB) Canadian Copyright Institute (PDF, 2 pages, 29 KB) Canadian Federation of Library Associations (PDF, 6 pages, 811 KB) Canadian Federation of Musicians (PDF, 38 pages, 500 KB) Canadian Intellectual Property Council (PDF, 5 pages, 155 KB) Canadian Internet Policy & Public Interest Clinic (PDF, 3 pages, 36 KB) Canadian Media Producers Association (PDF, 4 pages, 265 KB) Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency Ltd. (PDF, 9 pages, 347 KB) Canadian Musicians, Independent Label Owners and Creative Entrepreneurs c/o Miranda Mulholland(PDF, 3 pages, 174 KB) Canadian Music Policy Coalition (PDF, 13 pages, 1,025 KB) Canadian Publishers’ Council (PDF, 5 pages,...