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Outlining a Novel From Start to Finish The 20 Novels Project

Outlining a Novel From Start to Finish The 20 Novels Project https://medium.com/@ljcpress/outlining-a-novel-from-start-to-finish-6885f3f8e170 “Inciting incident: What brings the reader into the story? This is important because, if the inciting incident has nothing to do with the ending, it feels irrelevant. First Plot Point: This is the initial turning point of the story. Sometimes it’s a twist, and sometimes not, but it pulls the main character into reaction model. He or she has something to fight for or against. Second Plot Point: Some people call this the midpoint. It’s when the main character officially enters battle mode. The story has unfolded such that what the main character believed throughout the first half of the story has irrevocably changed that character’s mindset or understanding of the stakes. Third Plot Point: In many novels, the third plot point (or second, if you’re using the midpoint terminology) follows a bleak period for the protagonist. He or she feels defeated and exhausted. Then something happens to reel her back into the game. It’s often his desire to protect someone else or to save something he holds sacred. Climax: Call it the final battle. The protagonist and antagonist meet for the last (and sometimes the first) time to duke it out. The reader knows the stakes in their entirety and understands what weapons or tools both characters are bringing to the battle.”...

3D Printers in Ontario Public Libraries

Well, a majority of our libraries have them – the larger you the more likely but towns are catching up quickly and this is 2017 data. Printable version (PDF): Labs_3D_printers Makerspace and Other Labs, Ontario Public Library Percents and Totals by Band 2017 data All Ontario libraries (309 non-contracting libraries reporting in 2017) Total                   No. of       % of              Total    No. of        % of           Total No. Number of        Libraries   Libraries    No. of   Libraries   Libraries   of 3D Libraries           with Labs  with Labs   Labs     with 3D    with 3D      Printers 309 libraries     121             39                 235       73              24                209 Band 1 (Resident population greater than 250,000) (9 libraries)      8                 89                 49             8             89              68 Band 2 (Resident population greater than 100,000 and fewer than 250,001) (19 libraries)    15                79                 22             18            95              52 Band 3 (Resident population greater than 50,000 and fewer than 100,001) (24 libraries)    15   ...

How to Participate in Girls Who Code in Ontario Public Libraries

FOPL is partnering with Girls Who Code to bring free computer science opportunities to girls across our community and would love for your public library to host a Club! As a Girls Who Code Community Partner, we are joining students, parents and educators across the nation to promote gender equity in tech. We would love for you to take advantage of our partnership by hosting a Girls Who Code Club! Any 18+ adult who is passionate about the movement is eligible to lead a Club – that means you! Girls Who Code Clubs are FREE after-school programs that are designed to get girls ages 13-18 excited about computer science. In Clubs, girls engage in fun and engaging online coding tutorials, build community through interactive activities, learn about inspiring role models in tech, and work together to design solutions to real-world problems facing their communities. Clubs are designed to be run by anyone, regardless of experience with computer science. This Clubs Overview flyer includes all program details. To learn more about Girls Who Code Clubs, you can sign up for a Girls Who Code Webinar here. APPLY HERE TODAY!* Please let me know if you have any questions about how to get started, and thanks for supporting our partnership with Girls Who Code! Best, Stephen sabram@fopl.ca   Join one of our weekly webinars. Watch for more: (Recordings are available) FREE WED, NOV 14 5:00 PM Webinar: Clubs Info Session – Learn More Before You Apply! (Canada) NEXT STEPS FOR PROSPECTIVE INDIVIDUAL CLUBS – APPLY! The next step for a host site to start a Club is to complete the 2018-2019...

Ontario public libraries providing exceptional support to children and teens OPLA announces new Teen Services Survey and Award Recipients

Ontario public libraries providing exceptional support to children and teens OPLA announces new Teen Services Survey and Award Recipients   http://accessola.org/web/Documents/OLA/Divisions/OPLA/Child_and_youth/Teen%20Services%20Report%20-%20Web%20Version%20-%20Oct%2022.pdf NEWS RELEASE TORONTO, ON (November 6, 2018): Across the province, public libraries remain an essential community partner in the provision of services for teens, according to results of the Ontario Public Library Association (OPLA) Teen Services Survey, released today. As the report reveals, teens are recognized as a significant demographic with unique needs and it has become evident that libraries are responding. Some key findings from the report include: • Teen engagement at public libraries is on the rise, with opportunities for teens in communities big and small to be involved in the library by participating in teen advisory groups, strategic planning, and advising on physical teen space. • Public libraries remain a significant source for teen volunteer opportunities, with 93% of public libraries offering opportunities for teens to volunteer towards their OSSD volunteer hour requirements. • 51.3% of Ontario libraries reported having a makerspace at their library – including 50% of libraries serving fewer than 5,000 people. With more libraries incorporating makerspace programming, OPLA has reason to believe this number has increased further since original data was collected. • Teen programming is evolving, with more libraries offering teen programming that focuses on LGBTQ+ specific programming, homework help, and leadership programs. More than half of Ontario’s libraries are offering some kind of maker programing for teens, with just under half offering digital technology/media, STEM and robotics programming. • Public libraries are an important community partner, with libraries reporting more partnerships with diverse community agencies in support of effective...

The Young Canada Works 2019-2020 Campaign has launched!

The Young Canada Works 2019-2020 Campaign has launched! November 13, 2018 The Canadian Council of Archives is pleased to announce that the 2019-2020 campaign for the program Young Canada Works (YCW) for both Heritage Organizations and Building Careers in Heritage has been launched. Archival institutions as well as libraries operating in English are now able to apply online for both summer projects and internships via the YCW official web site. Please visit our web site for more information and to obtain a copy of the Employer Guide. You will find the links for the program’s Guidelines and application forms on the YCW website. IMPORTANT: The application deadline for the summer projects is January 15th, 2019. The application deadline to submit applications for internships to CCA is March 1st, 2019. If you have any questions concerning your application in the archival field, do not hesitate to contact Louise Charlebois or Isabelle Alain at ycw_jct@archivescanada.ca If you have any questions concerning your application as a library operating in English, do not hesitate to contact Sabrina Pound at  ycw-cla@archivescanada.ca (Via Canadian Council of...

Postmedia Cuts Publishing Days For 4 Newspapers

Postmedia Cuts Publishing Days For 4 Newspapers Postmedia’s local papers are taking another hit. “THE CANADIAN PRESS TORONTO — Postmedia Network Inc. says four Ontario newspapers will publish printed or digital editions one less day of the week with no reduction in the subscription price. The Kingston Whig-Standard and Belleville Intelligencer will cease Monday papers effective Nov. 19. The Brockville Recorder and Times, and Chatham Daily News will end Wednesday editions as of the same week. Chatham doesn’t have a Monday edition. In notices published on the various websites, readers were told that news will continue to be reported to its local websites and on social media. Content published on the days in question will move to other days of the week. The newspapers say the changes reflect the changing media landscape in North America and their own digital transformation. Postmedia has announced multiple rounds of layoffs and cost-reductions as it adjusts to industry...

Forward-thinking libraries meet in Hamilton, Ontario to discuss the future of library service and extending access with bibliotheca’s open+

Press Release: Bibliotheca [November 9, 2018] Forward-thinking libraries meet in Hamilton, Ontario to discuss the future of library service and extending access with bibliotheca’s open+ Oakdale, Minnesota – November 8, 2018 – Last month, Hamilton Public Library in Ontario, Canada, welcomed more than 30 library directors and management team members from 17 different Canadian library systems to participate in an open house focusing on its successful implementation of bibliotheca’s open+ library solution. Hamilton Public Library is the first Canadian library system to use the solution, which has been popular in Europe for a decade. open+ is a comprehensive system that allows libraries to extend access and increase open hours. Designed to complement traditional staffed hours, open+ offers libraries the ability to control building access, security, announcements and more from a remote central hub – all while integrating fully with libraries’ existing ILS. Hamilton Public Library first installed open+ in its Freelton branch to extend limited open hours and provide the rural community with improved access to the library’s space, materials and resources. Using open+, the Freelton branch increased its hours from just 17 to 60 per week, resulting in a 100% increase in library use compared to the same time last year. Due to the success of the first installation, Hamilton Public Library decided to install open+ at the Lynden branch, another location that serves a rural community. “We’re using innovation and technology to add hours to best meet our rural communities’ needs. open+ allows us to think differently about opening new branches and the ROI on smaller, rural locations,” explains Paul Takala, CEO and Chief Librarian, Hamilton Public Library. The...

Municipal Talking Points for Ontario Public and School Libraries

Municipal Talking Points for Ontario Public and School Libraries PUBLIC LIBRARIES There are few things that provide an opportunity to engage in city-building and place-making, with high social and economic return on investment than investing in a 21st Century public library as community hub. Broadly, the Ontario-wide trend for the past 10 years has been: A 66% increase in program attendance. A 83% increase in number of programs. An 8% increase in circulation. Over $5.00 in economic ROI for every dollar invested in public libraries Even higher social ROI returns to the community. The consequences of under-funding public libraries are a well researched area.  At the end of this executive summary are a selected long list of independent research studies that show the impact, value and outcomes from public library strategies on their communities. In short, communities with adequate public library service experience these consequences (and in the corollary they experience the negative consequences): Higher economic impact and development: The economic local impact of public libraries in Ontario average $5.41 for every dollar invested by the community. This is a very conservative calculation on economic impact alone. Real estate professionals report that public library branches increase home values (and therefore property taxes) and serve as a locus point for renewed re-development. This has been experienced in, for example, case studies of Vancouver Public Library’s central branch and the TPL Fort York branch.  They also attract new businesses and students. More successful employment and business development: A 2018 study by Nordicity of libraries of all sizes found that public library digital access services accomplished the following: 26% of library users...