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Female authors, Canadian titles dominate Toronto Public Library’s top 10 books of 2019

Female authors, Canadian titles dominate Toronto Public Library’s top 10 books of 2019 Torontonians’ reading habits were very different from previous years, librarian says https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/toronto-public-library-popular-books-top-ten-1.5389739 “Here are the top 10 books of 2019: Becoming by Michelle Obama. Washington Black by Esi Edugyan. Educated by Tara Westover. Kingdom of the Blind by Louise Penny. The Reckoning by John Grisham. The Testaments by Margaret Atwood. Women Talking by Miriam Toews. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. Dark Sacred Night by Michael Connelly. Normal People by Sally Rooney.” 6 millionth e-book borrowed “Electronic books also made a significant advance in popularity this year, Banks says. Near the beginning of December, the library marked its six millionth e-book borrowed of 2019, meaning it already surpassed last year’s total of just over five million digital books borrowed. “It was a big deal for me personally,” Banks said. “I thought it was really exciting.” Here are the top five e-books of 2019 Educated by Tara Westover. Washington Black by Esi Edugyan. Becoming by Michelle Obama. The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. “ “Children’s fiction is dominated by a handful of popular series, which are ranked in order here: Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney. Peppa Pig based on the TV series by Neville Astley and Mark Baker. Elephant and Piggy by Mo Willems. Captain Underpants by Dav Pilkey. Dog Man by Dav Pilkey. Geronimo Stilton by “Geronimo Stilton.” Apart from series, the library says standalone books by Dr. Seuss and Eric Carle are perennial...

Two amendments to the Public Libraries Act (PLA) that came into effect yesterday as part of the government’s Better for People, Smarter for Business Act, 2019. 

I am writing to inform you about two amendments to the Public Libraries Act (PLA) that came into effect yesterday as part of the government’s Better for People, Smarter for Business Act, 2019. The purpose of the legislation is to simplify and modernize regulations, and eliminate requirements that are outdated or duplicative, making regulatory processes more efficient for business and better for people. The first amendment, to section 10(1) of the PLA, will permit Canadian permanent residents to serve as public library board members.  Prior to this amendment, only Canadian citizens were permitted to serve on public library boards. This amendment provides boards with a larger and more diverse pool of potential board members. The second amendment, to section 16(1) of the PLA, reduces the minimum number of annual public library board meetings from ten per year to seven per year. This amendment provides more flexibility for public library boards to determine the appropriate number of meetings needed for their local circumstances. The wording of the amendments are available for review here.  I encourage you to share this information with your members. Kevin Finnerty Assistant Deputy Minister Culture Division Ministry of Heritage, Sport, Tourism and Culture...

Lambton County cultural sites earn high marks

Lambton County cultural sites earn high marks Lambton County residents really like their libraries, museums and art gallery, according to a $67,000 assessment carried out for the county’s cultural services division....

News Release Ontario Legislature passes the Better for People, Smarter for Business Act

News Release Ontario Legislature passes the Better for People, Smarter for Business Act December 10, 2019 Another big step making life easier for people and businesses by removing regulatory barriers to job creation TORONTO — Today, the Ontario Legislature officially passed the Better for People, Smarter for Business Act, 2019. The Act is part of the government’s signature package to address red tape and modernize regulations to make life easier for people and business. The legislation will lower the cost of doing business by making it simpler and more cost-effective to comply with regulations — leading to more jobs, higher wages and more opportunities for hard-working families. “Many regulations are in place for good reasons, like those that protect health, safety and the environment,” said Sarkaria. “But at the same time, decades of government regulation have resulted in rules that are duplicative, outdated or unclear, causing businesses to spend time and money complying with rules that simply could be better. We’re ensuring that Ontario’s regulations are effective, targeted, clear and focused — while maintaining Ontario’s high standards.” The broader package includes consultations on how to help food banks and community organizations with new, clarified regulations. This would allow them to focus on serving the most vulnerable among us. Other proposals would allow restaurants to decide whether or not to permit dogs on their patios, significantly increase the number of penalties for environmental violations and ensure that Ontarians are protected from drug shortages. The Better for People, Smarter for Business Act supports various business sectors including agriculture, trucking, construction, forestry and mining. It streamlines and consolidates rules and requirements for quarries, farming and...

FREE SirsiDynix Webinar: How Tiny Libraries Can Help Their Communities Thrive

How Tiny Libraries Can Help Their Communities Thrive Are you working for a library system in a small community? Are you looking for new ways to engage and grow your library? Working as a librarian will always come with its share of challenges, but even more challenges arise when working in a “small” library. The Institute of Museum and Library Services defines a small library as a system that services a population of 25,000 or less. Allie Stevens, founder of the social media group Tiny Library Think Tank, believes in the power of small libraries and is passionate about their success. Join this webinar to learn from Stevens about: Ways that librarians in very small, rural libraries can help their communities thrive through addressing community needs Forming partnerships with stakeholders Creating vital services and activities while avoiding burnout and strategic planning Don’t miss out on this opportunity to learn from a fellow librarian, hear her personal experiences about working in a rural community, and take home ideas that you can implement in your own small library. December 17 Date: Tuesday, December 17 Time: 1pm ET / 5pm GMT Place: Online Can’t attend the live...

Library Sector Input Successfully Impacts Amendments to Proposed Changes to Ontario’s Public Libraries Act

Library Sector Successfully Impacts Changes to Ontario’s Public Libraries Act The Ontario Government recently proposed two changes to Ontario’s Public Libraries Act affecting local public library boards as part of Bill 132, Better for People, Smarter for Business Act, 2019. This Bill is the latest in the provincial government’s ongoing red tape burden reduction efforts. FOPL strongly supports of the first of these changes, which, if passed, will give permanent residents the same opportunity as Canadian citizens to serve as Public Library Board members. Providing Public Library Boards with a larger and more diverse pool of prospective board members will help them welcome new voices, increase diversity & inclusion in community leadership, and better respond to the evolving needs of the people they serve. The proposed changes also included reducing the minimum number of meetings a public library board is required to hold annually to 4, down from the currently legislated minimum of 10. FOPL recognized the widespread concern of local public library boards regarding the extent of the proposed reduction of mandatory meetings. Through immediate and active engagement with the Ontario Government, as well as a deputation before the Standing Committee on General Government in Peterborough, we successfully advocated for an amendment to the proposed legislation.  It was amended by the Standing Committee with a new proposed mandatory minimum of 7 library board meetings per year. We believe this new minimum, reflecting the input of the library sector, strikes the right balance between the provincial government’s intent to provide boards with greater flexibility, and what is required to ensure that robust governance is maintained across all of Ontario’s...

CULC last week announced a project last week with the 8Rs Canadian Library Human Resources Research Team to conduct follow-up study of the CULC membership workforce.

The Canadian Urban Libraries Council (CULC) last week announced a project with the 8Rs Canadian Library Human Resources Research Team to conduct follow-up study of the CULC membership workforce. The project aims to replicate key components of the original research among CULC libraries to assist the community to respond to human resource trends. LIBRARIANSHIP.CA 8Rs and Canada’s Public Libraries The project aims to replicate key components of the original research among CULC libraries to assist the community to respond to human resource...

OCLC: Report on Public Libraries: A Community’s Connection for Career Services

Report on Public Libraries: A Community’s Connection for Career Services https://www.webjunction.org/news/webjunction/public-libraries-a-communitys-connection-for-career-services.html “This September 3, 2019 press release is republished courtesy of John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Rutgers University. Local public libraries serve an important role in the national workforce development system. This role has increased since the Great Recession and became formalized through changes in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014. Public libraries offer a range of career services, including résumé and cover letter support, job application assistance, interview preparation, training, and referrals to American Job Centers/other support services. A recent study from the Heldrich Center for Workforce Development chronicles the extent to which public libraries across the United States are providing these career services. Researchers used three strategies to address the research questions for this study: a literature review and data collection from library websites, a national survey of state library staff that included open-ended responses, and structured telephone interviews with local library staff. The research team used descriptive statistics and rigorous qualitative coding methods to analyze the data. While data are not nationally representative, researchers collected data from 42 states. Findings from the study report (pdf), written by Stephanie Holcomb, Amy Dunford, and Fopefoluwa Idowu, include: Seventy-five percent (75%) of survey respondents reported that libraries in their state provide career services. Most library staff respondents describe a strong demand for career services; for some, demand has slowed with the improving economy, but for a few, the demand has increased. Respondents reported that public libraries are regarded as accessible alternatives to traditional workforce service providers due to their flexibility, accessibility, and openness to all patrons. However, library staff reported that...