NEWSROOM

UK: “Public Libraries, The Case for Support”

New Report from the UK: “Public Libraries, The Case for Support” https://www.infodocket.com/2019/10/16/uk-new-report-public-libraries-the-case-for-support/ Via Gary Price at LJ InfoDocket From the Libraries Deliver Publication Announcement At a Parliamentary event at the House of Lords today [October 15, 2019], The Big Issue and Library Champion Bobby Seagull will join forces with CILIP, the UK library association, to make the case for long-term sustainable funding for libraries. The event, which will be attended by Members of Parliament, Member of the House of Lords and senior Civil Servants, will focus on the launch of two new campaign documents: A new joint CILIP/The Big Issue report Public Libraries: The Case for Support, which brings together for the first time the best currently-available evidence of the positive impact of libraries on their users, communities, locality and local economy, alongside stories from library users about their experiences and; A new 10-point Manifesto for Libraries, produced by Library Champion Bobby Seagull and CILIP, setting out the call for Government to recognise the wider value of libraries and librarians in areas such as health, education, business and policymaking. Public Libraries: The Case for Support draws on research and evidence from the British Library, Carnegie UK Trust, CIPFA and others to highlight the transformative impact of public libraries on: Place-shaping and inclusive economic growth Education, informal learning and skills Health, wellbeing and social care Digital skills and getting online Enterprise and business support Poverty prevention, social mobility and social isolation. Direct to Full Text Report: Public Libraries: The Case for Support 28 pages; PDF.”...

A Right Hard Won for Remembrance Day: The IFLA Intellectual Freedom Statement

The IFLA Intellectual Freedom Statement https://www.alsc.ala.org/blog/2019/10/the-ifla-intellectual-freedom-statement/ “On August 25, 2019, at the World Library and Information Conference (WLIC) in Athens, Greece, the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) celebrated 20 years of the IFLA Intellectual Freedom Statement. The statement was created by the IFLA committee on Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression (FAIFE) which was created to “defend and promote the basic human rights defined in Article 19 of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights… -Intellectual freedom is the right of every individual to both hold and express opinions and to seek and receive information. -Intellectual freedom is the basis of democracy. -Intellectual freedom is the core of the library concept.” (see: https://www.ifla.org/about-faife) The intellectual freedom statement urges librarians and library staff to adhere to the principles of intellectual freedom including freedom to express opinions, freedom to access all information, and the rights of the patron to privacy in selecting and using information. It was interesting, and a little bit concerning, when the rights of children to access of information were addressed at this presentation. Librarians are encouraged not only to make available any format of information desired by children, but also to be cautious about the use of technology. Many apps marketed to children collect data about the users. It is up to the librarians to know what is being collected particularly in the free apps that allow children to make movies, posters, books reports, and engage in other educational activities online. The presentation from Gennie Gebhart, Associate Director of Research, Electronic Frontier Foundation, was particularly chilling in considering the right to privacy. What...

Some College, No Degree

Some College, No Degree http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/10/31/new-data-36-million-americans-who-left-college-without-credential “Report features broad new data on 36 million Americans who left college without a credential, including 3.8 million who returned to college in the last five years, nearly one million of whom completed.” Data to support library e-learning services....

Public Libraries Respond to the Opioid Crisis with Their Communities (Summary Report and Case Studies From OCLC Research)

Public Libraries Respond to the Opioid Crisis with Their Communities (Summary Report and Case Studies From OCLC Research) https://www.infodocket.com/2019/11/01/new-summary-report-and-case-studies-from-oclc-research-public-libraries-respond-to-the-opioid-crisis-with-their-communities/ Via Gary Price “From OCLC Research: As the impact of the opioid epidemic is felt in communities across the US, public libraries are choosing to be part of the community response. With funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, (project number LG-00-18-0298-18), and in partnership with the Public Library Association (PLA), OCLC is sharing knowledge and resources that will help public libraries and their community partners develop effective strategies to address the opioid epidemic in America. [Clip] Eight public libraries and their respective community partners participated in this research study, which is based on interviews with library staff, library board members, staff at community partner organizations, and members of the community. This research surfaced the following as major outcomes of the libraries’ response activities: increased relevant resources made available to the community, such as naloxone and drug disposal kits made a positive impact on patrons’ lives increased community awareness and knowledge about the opioid crisis began to address stigma about substance use disorder increased positive perception of the library developed new partnerships and expanded existing ones, resulting in coordinated efforts that better meet community needs reached other libraries and community organizations Report Resources Full Text: Summary Report 44 pages; PDF. Case Studies 78 pages; PDF. Report Authors Scott G. Allen Public Library Association Larra Clark Public Library Association Michele Coleman Independent Researcher Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Ph.D. OCLC Chris Cyr Ph.D. OCLC Kendra Morgan OCLC Mercy Procaccini OCLC Research-Based Case Studies  Barrington Public Library Blount County Public Library Everett Public Library Kalamazoo...

Alberta provides the highest level of direct funding to PL boards

Alberta provides the highest level of direct funding to PL boards Government investing $37-million into public libraries https://www.fortsaskonline.com/local/government-investing-37-million-into-public-libraries “Local libraries got a good announcement. Friday morning (Nov.8) in Sherwood Park, Minister of Municipal Affairs Kaycee Madu announced on behalf of the Alberta Government an investment of $37-million into public libraries this year. “Our libraries are vital community and learning hubs that support local programs while bringing families and neighbours together,” said Madu. Library funding is remaining the same as in 2018-19, with $31-million going directly to library boards and $6-million in network support. The goal of the guaranteed funding is to allow libraries to continue delivering important services to communities. “This funding enables our library to continue providing essential services to our residents, especially job seekers, those with print disabilities and newcomers to Canada,” said Sharon Siga, the CEO of the Strathcona County Library. According to Madu, Alberta provides the highest level of direct funding to public library boards.”    ...

Bill 132: FOPL & OLA Survey of Minimum Number of Library Board Meetings in Public Libraries Act

Bill 132 Better for People, Smarter for Business Act, 2019 (Omnibus red tape / burden reduction bill) Bill 132 – Better for People, Smarter for Business Act, 2019 – What Does it Mean for Public Libraries? On Oct. 28, 2019, the Ontario government tabled its proposed red tape and regulatory burden legislation. This included two proposed amendments to the Public Libraries Act impacting public library boards. If passed, the first amendment would give permanent residents, in addition to Canadian citizens, the opportunity to serve as public library board members. This amendment would provide Ontario’s library boards with a larger and more diverse pool of potential board members. This will enable public library boards across the province to welcome new voices, increase diversity & inclusion in our community leadership, and help them better respond to the evolving needs of the communities they serve. The second proposed amendment would reduce the minimum number of meetings a public library board is required to hold each year. Bill 132 proposes to reduce the minimum number of meetings to 4 per year (from the current minimum of 10). Our understanding is that the intent of this amendment is to provide more flexibility for public library boards to determine the appropriate number of meetings needed for their local circumstances. Public library boards will still be able to hold regular meetings more frequently than the mandatory minimum, and can also declare special and emergency meetings accordingly as set out under the Public Libraries Act. As the bill proceeds for debate in the Ontario Legislature, the Ministry of Heritage, Sport, Tourism and Culture Industries is interested in feedback from the library sector on...