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Ontario Improving Internet and Cell Phone Service in Rural and Remote Communities

Just announced and released this morning – Ontario’s rural broadband plan. Haven’t had a chance to give it a read through yet but wanted to pass it along right away. https://www.ontario.ca/page/speed-ontarios-broadband-and-cellular-action-plan Ontario Improving Internet and Cell Phone Service in Rural and Remote Communities Up to Speed: Ontario’s Broadband and Cellular Action Plan Ontario is committed to finding innovative solutions to ensure people and businesses have access to the high-speed internet and cellular services that they need. Read our plan to help expand broadband and cellular access to rural, remote and northern communities. Minister’s letter In our increasingly digital world, we need to be connected. This means being able to quickly send an email, check our cell phones for directions or enjoy an online video chat with friends or family. Students need to be connected to finish homework assignments or take a university course online. Hard-working people need to be able to easily and immediately access digital resources on the go or to work remotely. Families want to stream video to their living rooms, pay bills with the click of a mouse and securely receive medical test results faster. For businesses across all sectors, whether it’s manufacturing, agriculture or e-commerce, they all depend on fast, reliable connections. It is unacceptable to this government that not everyone in Ontario has access to the broadband or cellular connections they need. In fact, as much as 12% of our population lives in communities – mostly rural, remote or northern areas – that are unserved or underserved. We need to do better. That’s why we are introducing Ontario’s first-ever broadband and cellular action plan....

Meet the Mi’kmaw lawyer who hopes her national book club helps turn the page toward reconciliation

Meet the Mi’kmaw lawyer who hopes her national book club helps turn the page toward reconciliation (The Star | 2019-07-13)  https://www.thestar.com/halifax/2019/07/13/meet-the-mikmaw-lawyer-who-hopes-her-national-book-club-helps-turn-the-page-toward-reconciliation.html Meet the Mi’kmaw lawyer who hopes her national book club helps turn the page toward reconciliation… New Brunswick’s Pam Palmater launched the Reconciliation Book Club on July 6 in response to questions Canadians were asking her about Indigenous issues....

Research Results: What Data Reveals About Public Libraries and their Communities

Click here to view this message in a browser window. Dear Colleague, I am pleased to share the first installment of Community Connections, an ongoingLJ Information Services research initiative that examines the changing role of public libraries and the needs of the communities they serve. Our goal is to give libraries—of all sizes and in all locations—direct visibility into the makeup of their communities and the challenges they face. The research and data analysis will yield insight to further strengthen library service, as well as enabling compelling casemaking to funders, voters, and new users, by illustrating the many ways libraries transform the people who use them, and the places they serve. The first report, Inside the Library Story: What Data Reveals About Public Libraries and their Communities, examines the library from the community’s perspective. Part one focuses on the essential cornerstones of library service: physical and digital access. Click here to read what data reveals about how well we’re delivering the foundations of library service across the U.S., which places needs more support, and which are leading the way. The second report will take a deep dive into the hot topic of electronic resources, while the third reexamines population served through the lens of sophisticated market segmentation. Check back next month for more key benchmarks and data-driven insights. Taken together, these reports provide a useful roadmap for the leaders of public libraries to make even better decisions about how to use resources effectively. And we’re just getting started. Look for a deeper dive powered by EveryLibrary Institute’s data scientists coming this fall. Best regards, David S. Greenough General Manager & Group...

Federal funding promotes youth engagement

Federal funding promotes youth engagement The federal government is accepting applications for the Youth Take Charge Program. The program aims to strengthen youth attachment to Canada through engagement. The application deadline is August 1. Apply...

Ontario grants to boost Francophone community

Ontario grants to boost Francophone community The Ontario government is accepting applications for the Francophone Community Grants Program. The program will help Ontario’s community organizations as well as francophone businesses and those that serve French-speaking Ontarians to implement projects that enhance the cultural and commercial vitality of the French-speaking population by driving community and economic development. The application deadline is August 19. Apply...

Why We’ll Always Love Small-Town Libraries

Why We’ll Always Love Small-Town Libraries Casey Cep, author of Furious Hours, reminds us that small-town libraries are irreplaceable and essential. Why We’ll Always Love Small-Town Libraries...

Almost half of Status First Nations children live in poverty, study finds

Almost half of Status First Nations children live in poverty, study finds https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2019/07/09/almost-half-of-status-first-nations-children-live-in-poverty-study-finds.html “Child poverty rates by community in 2016 Canadian average: 18% Status First Nations: 47% (53% on reserve; 41% off reserve) Non-status First Nations: 32% Inuit: 25% Métis: 22% Recent immigrant: 35% Racialized: 22% Non-racialized, non-Indigenous: 12% Source: Towards Justice: Tackling Indigenous Child Poverty in...