NEWSROOM

Seth Godin: 1,000 little steps

1,000 little steps “There’s nothing in the dentist’s office that was there fifty years ago. Every device, every compound, every technique has been changed. Bit by bit. Involving thousands of people and organizations. Improvements large and small (mostly small), in every corner. And every one of those improvements was met with resistance. Every change was fought, tooth (!) and nail. Every one had critics and skeptics and hold outs. That’s how the world changes. By drips. Persistent, generous, tiny...

WEBINAR:Marketing 103: How to Tell a Compelling Story That Engages Your Community

WEBINAR:Marketing 103: How to Tell a Compelling Story That Engages Your Community   Have you encountered challenges building enthusiasm about marketing internally? Are you looking for ways to build a more cohesive marketing plan? Learn how storytelling elements apply to marketing your library! Everyone loves a great story and compelling characters – it’s been hard-wired to our brains for tens of thousands of years. Common story structures are universal, easily and quickly absorbed and remembered by your community. The best marketers use this structure to help develop their authentic brand connection with their audience.Join Robert Storer and Christopher Foster for Library Marketing 103: How to tell a compelling story that engages your community and learn step-by-step exercises you and your team can use to better craft a compelling marketing message that will resonate with your users.See examples of engaging marketing storytellingConnect the embedded Story Structure to your own LibraryApply different kinds of transformations you can provide your communityReview examples from other librariesDon’t miss the continuation of the Library Marketing series as you take your library marketing skills and efforts to a higher level.Date:Time:Place:Thur, Dec 13 1pm ET / 5pm GMT GoToWebinarCan’t attend the live...

The best STEM toys you can buy for kids

The best STEM toys you can buy for kids Here are the best STEM toys you can buy: Best STEM toy overall: LEGO Boost Creative ToolboxBest STEM toy for younger kids: Snap Circuits Pro Electronics Exploration KitBest STEM toy for robotics: Microduino Itty Bitty BuggyBest STEM toy for basic programming skills: Makeblock Neuron Explorer KitBest screen-free STEM toy: Tinkering Labs Electric Motors Catalyst KitBest STEM toy for advanced computing skills: Piper Computer Kit Read on in the slides below to check out our top picks. The best STEM toy overall Why you’ll love it: The LEGO Boost Creative Toolbox comes with components for five specific robots, but can also be used to create any number of original creations. You’d think changing LEGOs would be gilding the lily, right? While there will always be a place in the toy chest for the classic plastic building blocks, the new techie spin the LEGO Boost line brings to this venerable toy is a welcome one indeed. Because before you start programming a robot to perform all sorts of tasks, you still have to build the thing one block at a time. In this case, your kid will start off by building one of five different robots the kit can be used to create. There’s a charming cat named Frankie, the M.T.R 4 (that’s Multi-Tooled Rover), a guitar, and more. You’ll have to deconstruct one creation to make the next, so make sure you take some pictures of each finished bot. Or of the original design LEGO robot you build once you’ve mastered the toy. But I’m ahead of myself. The first thing I noted when we broke out our LEGO Boost Creative Toolbox was...

Our 2018 Guide to Surviving Toddlers

Our 2018 Guide to Surviving Toddlers Hey, it works in libraries too! “Parenting through the toddler years can sometimes feel less like a rewarding experience and more like waking up and going into battle every day. We’ve written a lot about toddlers this year, and as we wrap up 2018, it feels like a good time to revisit and collect all our favorite toddler posts into one spot. For your survival, we’ve got peanut butter on a spoon, a toothbrush in the car, a pacifier inside a bear … and every hack in-between.”...

BookNet Canada Releases Bestselling Books of 2018 Lists (Fiction, Non-Fiction, Juvenile & YA)

BookNet Canada Releases Bestselling Books of 2018 Lists (Fiction, Non-Fiction, Juvenile & YA) Via Gary Price at LJ InfoDocket https://www.infodocket.com/2018/12/11/booknet-canada-releases-bestselling-books-of-2018-lists-fiction-non-fiction-juvenile-ya/ “From BookNet Canada: We identified the top-selling titles in the Fiction, Non-Fiction, and Juvenile/YA categories based on print sales volume in Canada over a 48-week period from Jan. 1, 2018 to Dec. 2, 2018 (according to BNC SalesData, which tracks print sales in the English-language trade market).10 Bestselling Fiction Books of 20181. The Woman in the Window by A. J. Finn (9780062799555)2. Then She Was Gone by Lisa Jewell (9781501192838)3. The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris (9780062877000)4. Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan (9780385679077)5. The Alice Network by Kate Quinn (9780062654199) Direct to Complete List The 10 Bestselling Non-Fiction Books of 20181. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson (9780062641540)2. 12 Rules for Life by Jordan B. Peterson  (9780345816023)3. Educated by Tara Westover (9781443452489)4. Becoming by Michelle Obama (9781524763138)5. Yum & Yummer by Greta Podleski  (9781775047001) Direct to Complete List Bestselling Titles in Canada in 2018 – Juvenile & YA The 10 bestselling Juvenile and YA books of 20181. Dog Man and Cat Kid by Dav Pilkey (9780545935180)2. The Wonky Donkey by Craig Smith (9780545261241)3. Lord of the Fleas by Dav Pilkey (9780545935173)4. The Meltdown (Diary of a Wimpy Kid Book 13) by Jeff Kinney (9781419727436)5. Love You Forever by Robert Munsch  (9780920668375) Direct to Complete List Direct to Complete Blog...

No permanent address? No problem. Berkeley library makes it easier for those without homes to get library cards

No permanent address? No problem. Berkeley library makes it easier for those without homes to get library cards No permanent address? No problem. Berkeley library makes it easier for those without homes to get library cards “Peterson lives outside and because she doesn’t have a home address she hasn’t been able to get a library card. Instead, to use the computer, she has to go to the Reference Desk for a new numerical code every hour.But that could change for her. On Dec. 1, all branches of the Berkeley Public Library started to issue Easy Access Cards, which are designed specifically for people who don’t have a fixed address. Those wanting a card will still need a photo ID, but don’t have to prove they have a residence, according to a recent circulation policy update.Easy Access cardholders will be able to check out three books or other library materials at a time, put holds on three items, use library computers and check out laptops for in-library use, said Elliot Warren, acting director of...

What was the Toronto Public Library’s most borrowed book in 2018? Hint: it wasn’t a novel

What was the Toronto Public Library’s most borrowed book in 2018? Hint: it wasn’t a novel https://www.thestar.com/entertainment/books/2018/12/11/what-was-the-toronto-public-librarys-most-borrowed-book-in-2018-hint-it-wasnt-a-novel.html Toronto Public Library’s Top 10 most-borrowed books of 2018: Official MTO Driver’s Handbook: borrowed 4,665 times so far in 2018*Origin by Dan Brown: 4,120Bellevue Square by Michael Redhill: 4,033The Rooster Bar by John Grisham: 3,640Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House by Michael Wolff: 3,547Into the Water by Paula Hawkins: 3,289Parting Shot by Linwood Barclay: 3,189The Late Show by Michael Connelly: 3,169Glass Houses by Louise Penny: 3,058Camino Island by John Grisham: 3,055 It’s the end of another year and, looking back to see what Torontonians read in 2018*, we’ve drawn a few unscientific conclusions about the reading habits of our citizens:  *Numbers reflect print books borrowed as of December 10, 2018. Final circulation numbers for the year will be higher. 1. People learn life skills at the library It’s an open secret that the Ontario Ministry of Transport’s Driver’s Handbook is the most-borrowed book pretty much every year. We think it shows that we’re useful to young people, newcomers and all kinds of folks who are looking to develop their life skills. Pro tip – if you’re getting ready for your driving test, we have multiple copies of the Handbook in every branch! 2. Local Giller-winners make good Toronto readers borrowed nearly as many copies of Bellevue Square, a literary thriller by Toronto-based author Michael Redhill, as they did of Origin, the latest blockbuster by international uber-bestselling author Dan Brown. We’re sure Bellevue Square winning the 2017 Scotiabank Giller Prize didn’t hurt because we saw the same thing last year, when Madeleine Thien’s Giller- and Governor General’s Award-winning family saga, Do Not Say We Have Nothing, swept the city. 3. Toronto readers care about what’s happening in the...

Forget Book Trailers: Book Playlists are the New Hotness

Forget Book Trailers: Book Playlists are the New Hotness “Book trailers are already such a thing that there’s whole weekly columns devoted to them, a whole slew of tips and tricks; a veritable ecosystem. People want multimedia with their books. But what if the new hotness wasn’t a trailer at all? What if it was something that lots of us already do anyways, with a much lower barrier for entry? I’m talking about book playlists, music that reflects the theme or the time and place of the book, a non-audiobook soundtrack that enhances and embellishes the written word. I love this idea!”...