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FOPL’s Get Out The Vote Videos

Here are some non-partisan, shareable videos about libraries and the October 22nd vote. First – check out the Municipal Elections Toolkit here: OLA’s Municipal Elections Toolkit Then, either share the links from FOPL’s Facebook and Twitter accounts or use the embed code on our YouTube channel.   Stephen  ...

Confused about the upcoming city election? The library is here to help

Toronto Public Library does it again.  And they’ll share the code with you! Confused about the upcoming city election? The library is here to help https://www.thestar.com/news/toronto-election/2018/10/03/confused-about-the-upcoming-city-election-the-library-is-here-to-help.html “If your head is still spinning from all the changes to the wards boundaries and candidates in the upcoming municipal election, Toronto Public Library has got your back. The library has created an interactive website called Know Your Vote T.O., complete with non-partisan info on what ward you’re in, who the candidates are and what they have to say, and even summaries of the major issues. While it’s the first time they’ve offered such a resource, Vickery Bowles, the city librarian, says she sees it as a natural part of their role as “a cornerstone of democracy.” “We’ve been a democratizing force in the modern world and people sometimes don’t think about that when they think about libraries, but that’s absolutely an important essential part of the work that we do,” she said. The website was in the works well before Premier Doug Ford shook up the election by unexpectedly chopping the wards almost in half, and aligning them with provincial ridings. It’s been “challenging” to create the site amid the uncertainty of shifting ward boundaries, Bowles said, but that makes it “probably a more important resource than...

FOPL Summary of Ontario Public Library Statistical & Metrics Projects

Here’s what FOPL, OLA, SOLS, OLS-North and our members been doing in Ontario for the last three years: 1. We re-analyzed the official Ontario public library data collection data on a per capita data in order to make valid peer comparisons.  You can see the report at:   2018 Federation of Ontario Public Libraries Ontario Public Library Operating Data 2008-2017 Overview, Primer on Library Statistics, and Collected Tables   http://fopl.ca/news/2018-federation-of-ontario-public-libraries-ontario-public-library-operating-data-2008-2017-overview-primer-on-library-statistics-and-collected-tables/   2017 FOPL Statistics and Peer Analyses http://fopl.ca/news/2017-ontario-public-library-statistics/   Released Oct. 3, 2018 First Nations Public Libraries: A Peer Study, 2014-2017 http://fopl.ca/news/released-oct-3-2018-first-nations-public-libraries-a-peer-study-2014-2017/   Public Library and First Nation Public Library Technology Needs in next two years from 2017 Public Library and First Nation Public Library Technology Needs in next two years from 2017 Annual Survey 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics Special Textual Data Reports Technology projects in the next two years, reported in the 2017 Annual Survey Significant Achievements reported in the 2017 Annual Survey of Public Libraries / 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics Significant Achievements reported in 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics – text field Aug 2018 Reciprocal Borrowing Agreements and Policies where there are no Non-Resident User Fees Reciprocal Borrowing Agreements from 2017 Annual Survey, Aug 2018 report Non-traditional circulating library collections http://fopl.ca/news/non-traditional-circulating-library-collections/ Public Library and First Nation Public Library approved Capital Project Plans for completion in next two years reported for 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics Capital projects in the next two years, reported in 2017 Annual Survey Aug 2018 Our basic data measurements (limited by the data collected but we’ve gotten the government to improve what they collect!) fall into these buckets: The data presented...

FOPL October Update Summary

Hi FOPL Members: Just a lot happening at FOPL so I thought I’d send you a list of recent postings that may be useful for you during this election period as well as for your strategic planning needs: Released: Municipal Election Toolkit: Get ready for your local election! http://fopl.ca/news/released-municipal-election-toolkit-get-ready-for-your-local-election/   2018 Federation of Ontario Public Libraries Ontario Public Library Operating Data 2008-2017 Overview, Primer on Library Statistics, and Collected Tables   http://fopl.ca/news/2018-federation-of-ontario-public-libraries-ontario-public-library-operating-data-2008-2017-overview-primer-on-library-statistics-and-collected-tables/   2017 FOPL Statistics and Peer Analyses http://fopl.ca/news/2017-ontario-public-library-statistics/   Released Oct. 3, 2018 First Nations Public Libraries: A Peer Study, 2014-2017 http://fopl.ca/news/released-oct-3-2018-first-nations-public-libraries-a-peer-study-2014-2017/   Public Library and First Nation Public Library Technology Needs in next two years from 2017 Public Library and First Nation Public Library Technology Needs in next two years from 2017 Annual Survey 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics Special Textual Data Reports Technology projects in the next two years, reported in the 2017 Annual Survey Significant Achievements reported in the 2017 Annual Survey of Public Libraries / 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics Significant Achievements reported in 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics – text field Aug 2018 Reciprocal Borrowing Agreements and Policies where there are no Non-Resident User Fees Reciprocal Borrowing Agreements from 2017 Annual Survey, Aug 2018 report Non-traditional circulating library collections http://fopl.ca/news/non-traditional-circulating-library-collections/ Public Library and First Nation Public Library approved Capital Project Plans for completion in next two years reported for 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics Capital projects in the next two years, reported in 2017 Annual Survey Aug 2018 TPL is pleased to share with you the results of a two  year study to  assess the impact of technology services offered in Ontario...

Special Reports from the 2017 Ontario Public Library Operating Data

Technology projects in the next two years, reported in the 2017 Annual Survey   Significant Achievements reported in 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics – text field Aug 2018   Reciprocal Borrowing Agreements from 2017 Annual Survey, Aug 2018 report   Non-traditional circulating collections 2017 information Aug 2018 rev1   Capital projects in the next two years, reported in 2017 Annual Survey Aug...

Non-traditional circulating library collections

Non-traditional circulating library collections The Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport publishes the annual Ontario Public Library Statistics that FOPL uses to create its reports on the state of Ontario’s libraries and to create a longitudinal dataset of those data from 2000-2017. We are familiar with questions that ask for a number: how many X? Numbers have characteristics we can use. We can add them, to get totals for a set of libraries. For example, in 2017, the Ontario public libraries circulated 122 million items. That number comes from adding the figures from each of the libraries. It has meaning and that meaning is readily comprehensible. However, not all matters libraries deal with are quantifiable and when one leaves quantitative questions, the means of analysis change. Some questions posed by the Ministry in its annual survey that are not quantitative but qualitative. The Ministry has just published five spreadsheets of those text data from the 2017 data collection. They are sharing these data. In effect, these data present a challenge: this looks interesting, what do you make of it? We examine one of those files here: the spreadsheet of “Non-traditional circulating library collections. The note on the spreadsheet says: Gathered from write-in text field C6.1 “If you have non-traditional circulating library collections (e.g. fishing gear, recreation equipment, musical instruments, seed gardens etc.) please list them in the write-in field below.” The results are free-text: people just answered the question with an array of non-traditional items they circulate. There are no authority files so one library says it lends “Walking poles” and another says, “Norwegian walking poles.” Are they the...

5 ways to help people feel more connected to their local community

5 ways to help people feel more connected to their local community Research confirms: Arts & culture can help strengthen our sense of belonging to each other and to our communities. https://www.municipalworld.com/feature-story/building-culture-belonging/ The following five recommendations highlight ways for municipalities to to help people of all backgrounds feel more connected: 1. Strengthen public policy, planning, and funding 2. Support high-quality arts experiences 3. Offer participatory arts programs 4. Use the city as a stage 5. Open arts facilities to the community  ...

Released Oct. 3, 2018 First Nations Public Libraries: A Peer Study, 2014-2017

First Nations Public Libraries: A Peer Study, 2014-2017 First_Nations_Libraries_and_Their_Peers_2014-2017 53 page PDF As with previous report we can see that First Nation Public Libraries are performing very well.  Great job! “This is the third peer analysis we have done of Ontario’s First Nations libraries. The goal here, as earlier, is to offer a stable means of comparing the data from 46 First Nations’ libraries for the four years from 2014 to 2017 along with nine major Ontario public libraries. In addition, we provide select summary data from these libraries from 2000-2017 as we did for Ontario’s public libraries in our latest report on these libraries from the data published by the Ministry of Tourism, Culture, and Sport. The data were drawn from the raw data on Ontario’s public libraries compiled and published separately by the Ministry from 1999-2017 and recompiled by FOPL to include the 2000-2017 data in one longitudinal file. Historically, public library data have been used largely for comparisons of peers and usually those comparisons are on peers by size of the library, but other means of organizing peer groups have been used. In this report, the comparisons are based on the Ministry’s classification of “First Nations Libraries.” Given that libraries vary so much in budgets, collections, staff, and resident population–the distributions are commonly highly skewed–the common practice is to use ratios of variables for analysis and comparison. We have discussed this use of ratios in the Primer accompanying the annual FOPL summary reports about Ontario’s Public Libraries. For example, in the 2017 data, Toronto Public Library reported circulation of 30 million items by its 2.2 million...

Research: Creative Writing at the Library

Creative Writing at the Library September 13, 2018 https://www.alsc.ala.org/blog/2018/09/creative-writing-at-the-library/ “As part of our ALSC mentorship, AnnMarie Hurtado from the Pasadena Public Library and I, an MLIS student at San Jose State University’s iSchool, created a survey about the use of creative writing programs, specifically for children, in public libraries. Both of us write as a passion, and I used to attend creative writing programs at my local library both as a child and teen, so we were both curious as to how public libraries encourage writing—especially now that many libraries are (rightfully) moving full STEAM ahead. Our main interest was in the kind of creative writing programs libraries held, and what the goals of those programs were—were they more educational, or designed for attendees to flex their creativity? Were they run by staff members, or did they give kids the chance to talk to real live authors? We shared our survey on three Listservs: CALIX (calix@listserv.cla-net.org), ALSC (alsccolmgt@lists.ala.org; alsc-l@lists.ala.org) and PUBYAC (pubyac@lists.lis.illinois.edu), and included questions about who taught the creative writing program (staff member, volunteer, paid professional, etc.), what resources are used to prepare for the program, the age range of participants, and what the overall goals of the programs were. We received 43 responses from librarians all over the US and Canada. The survey was not restricted to children’s creative writing programs, but the majority of responses listed children or teens as their targeted age group, with six programs open to all ages, six libraries holding separate programs for children/teens and adults, and three libraries with adult-only programs. Whatever the intended age group of the programs, their main goal was...

Significant Achievements reported in the 2017 Annual Survey of Public Libraries / 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics

Significant Achievements reported in the 2017 Annual Survey of Public Libraries / 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics Significant Achievements reported in 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics – text field Aug 2018 Library Name Significant Achievements Ajax Library celebrated its 65th anniversary. Library began the Connected Seniors program. Ground breaking for new branch location Alnwick/Haldimand Twp Library Board completed its first Strategic Plan. Renovations were completed at the two oldest branches: new carpeting, new paint, updated furniture. Experimented with a variety of adult programming which is a recent initiative: successful mosaic workshop, memoir writing workshop, local author visit, and C.O.P.S. – Correctional Officers Paranormal Society session that discovered ghosts (of course!) in former church, now community hall, in Centreton. Arnprior Music of your Life program received several provincial awards and recognition and has now expanded to area Hospice and hospitals; Plans being developed for renovations in 2019 or 2020 in conjunction with the library’s 125th anniversary in 2020. Asphodel-Norwood Successful Paint Nite Fundraiser held. First annual “Pumpkin Parade” held (welcomed over 100 participants). New Book Club established. Series of programming for Seniors established. Assiginack Twp More community groups using maker space and meeting space. Augusta Twp Partnered with the local historical society to print and publicize a book on the historic stone buildings in the township. Partnered with the township in the development of the Recreational and Cultural plan. Aundeck-Omni-Kaning FN Implemented cataloguing system. Aurora APL Book Bike Bancroft Town Proposed Union Library partnership with 3 other area libraries.  Still in discussion phase at end of 2017 Barrie New program and space – Collaboratory including sewing machines, vinyl printer/cutter, button...