NEWSROOM

Video: Building Public-Private Partnerships

Having trouble viewing this message? Click here.   “ULI’s involvement from the public and the private area is part of what allows us to see where things are going in the future.” >> Watch Video Real estate projects require both private and public sector cooperation, and understanding both sides is critical. ULI’s multidisciplinary approach to solve real estate’s biggest problems is what brings the industry’s thought leaders to ULI over any other real estate...

Public libraries: Community hubs responding to the needs of older adults

Public libraries: Community hubs responding to the needs of older adults Aug 1, 2018 – McMaster University – https://www.mcmasteroptimalaging.org/blog/detail/blog/2018/08/01/public-libraries-community-hubs-responding-to-the-needs-of-older-adults#.XSU0hQEiQxw.twitter “The Bottom Line Public libraries are community hubs providing a central access point to a range of programs and services designed to meet the needs of the community. Public libraries play a significant role in meeting the educational, informational, cultural, recreational, health and social-care needs of older adults. Guidelines exist to specifically design library programs and services for older adults and people with disabilities. Public libraries play a vital role in the life of their community. They are community hubs, meaning that they provide a central access point for a range of cultural and recreational programs and services, along with health and social programs and services to nurture community life.(1) Over the years, public libraries have developed a diversity of programs and services to meet the evolving needs of older adults. Such programs and services often aim to offer lifelong learning opportunities. A systematic review examining the evolution of public libraries in the United States showed that older adults are quite eager to participate in lifelong learning activities.(2) This review revealed a wide range of topics of interest among older adults, including hobbies, leisure pursuits, humanities, social and international issues, religion, philosophy, arts, technology and health-related issues (such as common health problems, nutrition and stress management). It’s no wonder we see so many older adults going to public libraries to access books, watch movies, listen to music, read newspapers, take classes (for example, language, cooking or computer), and attend workshops and lectures. Older adults who do not have computer equipment...

Congratulations to former Librarian and Archivist of Canada, Ian E. Wilson, O.C. promoted to Officer of the Order of Canada

Order of Canada Promotion “Congratulations to former Librarian and Archivist of Canada, Ian E. Wilson, O.C. promoted to Officer of the Order of Canada for “For his sustained leadership in the development and accessibility of public archives, and for his published works on history, heritage and information management.” See the full list of appointments and promotions within the Order of Canada announced 27 June...

London Public Library CEO and Chief Librarian to Retire

July 8, 2019 London Public Library CEO and Chief Librarian to Retire After 29 years at London Public Library, including the last 11 years as Chief Executive Officer & Chief Librarian, Susanna Hubbard Krimmer has announced that she will retire at the end of August this year. Susanna Hubbard Krimmer is an accomplished, highly-respected leader in the library profession. In 2016 she was recognized with the Ontario Library Association President’s Award for Exceptional Achievement and in 2018 she received the Ontario Library Association (OLA) Lifetime Achievement Award. The last decade has been a period of significant innovation, revitalization and financial stewardship at London Public Library (LPL). Ms. Hubbard Krimmer’s retirement takes place as the current strategic plan wraps up. LPL’s strategic plan, Library Space is Community Place, saw outstanding community consultation and outreach, with more than 7,500 Londoners providing feedback. This plan emphasized creating more personalized user experiences and exceptional physical spaces as well as demonstrating LPL’s leadership, value and return on investment to the citizens of London. Ms. Hubbard Krimmer has led LPL through a period of facility renewal, with renovations to the branch libraries serving communities across London. The historic Glanworth Branch Library was rebuilt and made physically accessible. Most recently, LPL opened the already popular Bostwick Branch Library in the new multipurpose facility in the southwest in partnership with the City of London and the YMCA of Southwestern Ontario. The revitalization of Central Library included extensive infrastructure renewal, supported through funding from the City of London. It also included the addition of new spaces for studying, meeting and gathering and the establishment of creative spaces such...

New CEO of London Public Library Announced

July 11, 2019 New CEO of London Public Library Announced The London Public Library Board is pleased to announce that Michael J. Ciccone has been appointed to the position of Chief Executive Officer of London Public Library (LPL). Mr. Ciccone will assume this role at the end of August, when Susanna Hubbard Krimmer retires after 29 years at LPL, 11 years as CEO& Chief Librarian. With his experience building relationships on a national level and success as an advocate for public library services, the London Public Library Board is confident in their selection of Mr. Ciccone as LPL’s next CEO. “We are very excited to find a candidate who so clearly values inclusion, diversity and accessibility and has leveraged these values to lead a significant organization from the start-up phase to international recognition”, says Mariam Hamou, Chair of the London Public Library Board. “Michael is a collaborative, professional leader that will be able to build upon the existing strengths and achievements of LPL to meet the future opportunities of library service head on.” Mr. Ciccone is a champion of equitable library service and has extensive leadership experience in public libraries in the United States and Canada. Most recently, Mr. Ciccone served as the Executive Director of the Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA), a national non-profit organization that supports public libraries in the provision of accessible collections to Canadians with print disabilities in the formats of their choice, including audio, braille, and electronic text. CELA launched in 2014, and, under Mr. Ciccone’s leadership, has become internationally recognized. There are now more than 600 public library systems in Canada who are...

International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) Publishes 2018 Annual Report

Members of FOPL are members of IFLA through our membership in CFLA: International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) Publishes 2018 Annual Report “From IFLA: Each year, IFLA Headquarters compiles its Annual Report which provides a comprehensive overview on our activities throughout the preceding year. The report gives IFLA Members and other interested parties full and transparent details on our activities, achievements and financial performance. Direct to Full Text Report  32 pages; PDF. Direct to Flip Book...

6 Steps to Building Partnerships That Benefit Your Library Campaigns

6 Steps to Building Partnerships That Benefit Your Library Campaigns 6 Steps to Building Partnerships That Benefit Your Library Campaigns by Patrick Sweeney “One of the biggest issues EveryLibrary runs into when we are working on a campaign for a library is that the library lacks social and political capital. The staff often have not been able to dedicate the time and energy needed to build strategic and long-lasting relationships that are necessary to win (or at least fund) a campaign or political initiative. That means that once an initiative begins to take shape, the library has to spend even more energy in a short time frame building the relationships necessary to support their campaign. These kinds of short-term relationships are often seen as one-sided to benefit the library. It can appear that the potential ally is just being used as a political tool for the campaign instead of being brought on to a campaign as a real partner. However, if the library had taken the time in the years before the campaign to build partnerships, there would be much less risk of turning that potential relationship into opposition to the library. A Real-life Example in Action One of my first real experiences with this problem was while I was working with a library that faced well-organized opposition to the new library building and lost. The opposition stemmed from, of all places, the local community garden group. The community gardeners were worried that the new library building would cast a shadow over their garden. The library previously had no relationship with the gardeners and never realized that the gardeners could be a...

CFLA and NIKLA Release First Nations, Métis, and Inuit – Indigenous Ontology (FNMIIO)

CFLA and NIKLA Release First Nations, Métis, and Inuit – Indigenous Ontology (FNMIIO) July 1, 2019 To mark National Indigenous Peoples Day on June 21, the National Indigenous Knowledge and Language Alliance (NIKLA) and the Canadian Federation of Library Associations (CFLA) released the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit – Indigenous Ontology (FNMIIO), a working list of Indigenous Names to better reflect how Indigenous people currently prefer to refer to themselves. The FNMI Ontology is intended to be a living document that will be updated and revised based on information gathered through research or consultations. Future plans include distribution as MARC authority records and in linked data formats. Fields in the ontology include: Community Name Used For Alternate Names/Spellings Cultural Affiliations Political Affiliations Language(s) Treaty/Agreement/Settlement Band # Reserve/Settlement Name Reserve/Settlement Location (NRCan) Source(s) (Via Canadian Federation of Library Associations and National Indigenous Knowledge and Language...