The Federation of Ontario Public Libraries is a non-profit with a mandate to benefit Ontario public libraries through advocacy, research, and marketing.

La Fédération des bibliothèques publiques de l’Ontario est un organisme à but non-lucratif. Elle a comme mandat, de répondre aux besoins de toutes les bibliothèques, en concentrant leurs efforts dans la recherche, en marketing et en agissant comme plaidoyeur.



ONN Advocacy win! Suspension of anti-spam Private Right of Action means board members won’t have to risk personal assets

Advocacy win! Suspension of anti-spam Private Right of Action means board members won’t have to risk personal assets Imagine Canada and the Ontario Nonprofit Network welcome the announcement that the federal government is indefinitely suspending the Private Right of Action (PRA) provisions in Canada’s Anti-Spam Law (CASL). The Private Right of Action is a right for private parties to obtain statutory damages for breach of CASL’s anti-spam commercial electronic messages regulations, including email harvesting restrictions under the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIDEDA) (with damages up to $200 for each contravention to a maximum of $1,000,000 per day.) “This is great news for charities and for the volunteers from all walks of life who serve on their boards,” said Bruce MacDonald, President & CEO of Imagine Canada. “Charities have been working hard to understand and meet their obligations under CASL. Many remain concerned about whether they are fully compliant with the complex regulations, and the majority of organizations we surveyed have incurred significant financial costs attempting to comply. We appreciate the government’s sensitivity to our concerns and we look forward to participating in the anticipated Industry Committee review of the legislation – which we hope will take place soon.” “The PRA has no threshold – no need to prove harm, just that a commercial electronic message was sent,” said Cathy Taylor, Executive Director of the Ontario Nonprofit Network (ONN). “Charities and nonprofit organizations with their limited staff and use of volunteers are at high risk for inadvertent mailing list errors. Organizations and their Board of Directors have been concerned that their organizational assets and the personal assets... read more

Impressions of the Impact of the Arts on Quality of Life and Well-Being in Ontario

New report: Ontarians value the positive impact of arts on quality of life Toronto, June 8, 2017 – A new Ontario Arts Council (OAC) study conducted by Nanos Research shows that Ontario residents recognize the important contribution of the arts to vibrant, livable communities. Impressions of the Impact of the Arts on Quality of Life and Well-Being in Ontario, the Nanos Research report based on a random survey of 1,004 individuals, found that a large majority of Ontarians agree that the arts contribute to the various elements of quality of life and community well-being. The research also demonstrated how strongly these views are held by Ontarians. Survey Highlights Arts and quality of life 93% of Ontarians agree that arts activities help enrich the quality of our lives. 90% of Ontarians say that the arts are important to improving the quality of life in their communities. 85% say that the arts are important to improving the quality of their own lives. Arts and identity and belonging 91% of Ontarians agree that the arts help us to understand other cultures better. 88% agree that participating in arts activities builds a shared sense of community identity. Arts and community well-being 90% agree that an active local arts scene helps make a community a better place to live. 97% agree that engaging children in the arts is important to their overall development. 80% of Ontarians agree that an active local arts scene helps communities attract businesses. Government investment in the arts 82% of Ontarians agree that helping make the arts available to people in Ontario is an important government investment. 79% agree that... read more

Boosting Online Access at the Hamilton Public Library

Boosting Online Access at the Hamilton Public Library July 30, 2014 Public libraries are key community providers of e-learning and digital resources. While continuing to fulfill traditional roles, they are also evolving programs and collections to support digital literacy. To meet these demands, the Hamilton Public Library partnered with ORION to improve online access for their clients and foster life-long learning while still meeting their budgetary targets. Hamilton Public Library Hamilton Public Library had a problem: It needed to meet the growing demand for online access and digital content without increasing the cost of maintaining high-speed Internet access and wifi connections for users at its 23 library branches. It’s all part of the evolution of the library, says Paul Takala, chief librarian. He approached ORION for help, and in late 2010, the Hamilton Public Library was connected to ORION’s ultra-fast broadband network. Working with ORION is a perfect solution, says Lita Barrie, the director of digital technology and youth services at the library. “Since 2010 we’ve seen a huge move to our visitors wanting to consume media through the Internet,” says Barrie. “I don’t know that we would be able to offer the type of service that we currently offer without ORION’s support.” That support means “we’ve been able to allow our community members and customers to access what they want to access,” says Barrie. This includes 425,000 hours of Internet use which is sometimes devoted to everyday tasks — library patrons checking their email or using social media to keep in touch with friends and family. Other users access educational resources. Many library patrons watch YouTube. Access to... read more