ALA’s Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIF) Releases List of the Top 100 Most Banned and Challenged Books of the Past Decade

ALA’s Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIF) Releases List of the Top 100 Most Banned and Challenged Books of the Past Decade Via Gary Price at LJ InfoDocket https://www.infodocket.com/2020/09/27/alas-office-of-intellectual-freedom-oif-releases-list-of-the-top-100-most-banned-and-challenged-books-of-the-past-decade/ “From the American Library Association: Today, the American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) released the Top 100 Most Banned and Challenged Books from the past decade. The list’s release launches Banned Books Week, Sept. 27 – Oct. 3, a vibrant week of programming to rally readers to the cause of First Amendment protections and remind them to remain vigilant about continual threats to our freedom to read. Sherman Alexie’s “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian” tops the list as the most banned and challenged book from 2010-2019. Alexie joins Toni Morrison, Alex Gino, John Green and E. L. James as some of the most censored authors. Many of the titles on the list have also been adapted for the screen, including “Captain Underpants,” “The Hunger Games,” “Gossip Girl,” “The Hate U Give,” “The Glass Castle” and “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close.” The list includes books challenged for a variety of reasons: LGBTQIA+ content, sexual references, religious viewpoints, content that addresses racism and police brutality, and profanity. Although the reasons differ, the censorship of literature in libraries share a common result: the violation of our First Amendment rights. Top 20 From the List The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie Captain Underpants (series) by Dav Pilkey Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher Looking for Alaska by John Green George by Alex Gino And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell Drama by Raina Telgemeier Fifty Shades of Grey by E. L. James... read more

Here’s how much it costs to have a Toronto Library named after you

Here’s how much it costs to have a Toronto Library named after you https://www.blogto.com/city/2020/09/how-much-it-costs-toronto-library-named-after-you/ “A Toronto Public Library branch could one day be named after you — as long as you have millions in the bank to spare (and maybe have been dead for two years, at least.) The city’s public library board has just released some new guidelines for how Toronto’s libraries, and the spaces within them, get their names. The goal: to accumulate funding for the TPL Foundation by way of donations from Toronto’s moneyed folk with the promise of naming opportunities for library branches, rooms, programs or collections.”... read more