Federation of Ontario Public Libraries

OLA has a display as part of the Community Exhibits Program at the Legislative Assembly of Ontario

OLA has a display as part of the Community Exhibits Program at the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. This exhibit presents just a few of the fun, weird and wonderful things that you can ‘check out’ from libraries across Ontario. #ILoveOnLibraries #ONPoli Hamilton Public Library has one too. Ontario’s Libraries – A Visit Will Get You Thinking /  “Une visit : ça fait réfléchir” Ontario is home to 379 public library systems. Each library is defined by its community. A library inspires people to try new things. This exhibit by the Ontario Library Association presents just a few of the fun, weird and wonderful things that you can ‘check out’ from libraries across Ontario. Visit us at www.accessola.org/ Thanks to a partnership with the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters, young fishing enthusiasts at Elliot Lake Public Library can check out fishing tackle in this town surrounded by pristine wilderness. Savvy Seniors at Marathon Public Library can take classes and check-out iPads and Tablets. The library helps you learn about devices and gadgets that can bring the world to you. Many libraries in small communities showcase local art. At Sioux Lookout Public Library Ahmoo Angeconeb, an Anishnaawbe artist from Lac Seul First Nation, donated the beautiful “The Four Sacred Gifts” to the Library, now on permanent display in the children’s area. Like many libraries nestled in an agricultural community, Grimsby Public Library users borrow from the seed library to grow their own fresh food. Ontario winters are long, but Greater Sudbury Public Library users can make the most of the winter by borrowing snow shoes. Public Libraries love partnerships that...

Free G1 Driver Training for Public Libraries

At least 44 Ontario library systems use this free service. This program includes access to G1 driving practice tests to get folks ready for their G1 knowledge exam, as well all the information they need about getting their driver’s license. No library card required. Here’s some more info: https://www.g1.ca/library/ Since it’s summer and lots of teenagers are preparing for their driving test, this is something that may be worth sharing through public libraries in Ontario. G1.ca offers a free online driver’s education program to Ontario’s libraries. Currently, 45 public and school libraries across the province already offer the program to their communities. The program includes free access to G1 driving practice tests to get your members ready for their knowledge exam at the DriveTest testing centre plus all the information they need about getting their driver’s license. There is no charge to the library or its members. There are two ways your library can participate: 1) Include a link to the program (https://www.g1.ca) on their website (this is the most straightforward option). Promotional materials: https://www.g1.ca/promote/. Site logos: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/acyoj9xoma6pg8v/AACyrpSGBpMjHiaNAeXP1zkHa?dl=0, or 2) Sign up for a library-branded program (https://www.g1.ca/library/) to be able to receive usage statistics. The program is designed to prepare both aspiring and experienced drivers (such as teenagers, newcomers to Ontario, or senior citizens) to pass their G1 knowledge exam. It includes unlimited access to practice tests for car and motorcycle, an exam simulator, and a G1-related FAQ. The program doesn’t collect any personal information from its users. G1.ca is part of the Driving-Tests.org network. In the United States, over 2,300 libraries have been using the driver’s ed program for...