The Federation of Ontario Public Libraries is a non-profit with a mandate to benefit Ontario public libraries through advocacy, research, and marketing.

La Fédération des bibliothèques publiques de l’Ontario est un organisme à but non-lucratif. Elle a comme mandat, de répondre aux besoins de toutes les bibliothèques, en concentrant leurs efforts dans la recherche, en marketing et en agissant comme plaidoyeur.



Literacy and numeracy among off-reserve First Nations people and Métis: Do higher skill levels improve labour market outcomes?

Literacy and numeracy among off-reserve First Nations people and Métis: Do higher skill levels improve labour market outcomes? by Paula Arriagada and Darcy Hango Statistics Canada Release date: May 18, 2016  More information PDF version “Overview of the study This article examines the literacy and numeracy skills of off-reserve First Nations and Métis adults, focusing on the factors and labour market outcomes associated with higher skill levels. In this study, individuals in the higher range for literacy and numeracy are defined as those who scored level 3 or higher (out of 5 levels) in tests administered by the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). Off-reserve First Nations and Métis adults have lower literacy and numeracy scores than non-Aboriginal adults. For example, just over one-third (35%) of off-reserve First Nations people and 50% of Métis aged 25 to 65 had higher literacy scores (level 3 or higher), compared with 57% among non-Aboriginal adults. For off-reserve First Nations, Métis and non-Aboriginal adults, a higher level of education was associated with higher literacy and numeracy skills. Among those with a university degree, however, the proportion of off-reserve First Nations adults with higher skills remained lower than that of non-Aboriginal adults. Among those who had higher literacy skills (level 3 or higher), off-reserve First Nations adults aged 25 to 54 had a 75% probability to be employed, compared with 80% among Métis adults and 91% among non-Aboriginal adults. Non-Aboriginal adults aged 25 to 54 with lower literacy skills (level 2 or lower) were more likely to be employed than off-reserve First Nations adults with higher skills (level 3 or higher), even after... read more

Ontario Helping More Schools Become Community Hubs

Possible partnership opportunities here. News Release Ontario Helping More Schools Become Community Hubs May 6, 2016 Province Investing in Schools to Better Serve Communities Ontario is investing nearly $90 million dollars to expand child care and child and family support programs in schools and create spaces in schools for community use. As a response to recommendations in Community Hubs in Ontario: A Strategic Framework and Action Plan, the province committed to supporting the use of schools as community hubs. Community hubs bring together and integrate a range of needed services under one roof to better serve their communities. A community hub can be a school, neighbourhood centre or other public space that houses coordinated services. Ontario’s nearly 5,000 schools offer the ideal location for community hubs, as many of them are the heart of their community and are accessible. As part of today’s $90 million investment to further enable the development of community hubs, the province will provide: $20 million to create space for new child care and child and family support programs through Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres in schools $18 million to retrofit existing child care space within a school to open up more spaces for children under four years old $50 million to renovate surplus school space to make it available for use by community partners and the public Expanded eligibility for school capital funding to include building replacement space for eligible community partners in new schools or additions to existing schools in the event their original school location is closed. Ontario is also making it easier for community partners to create community hubs... read more