Federation of Ontario Public Libraries

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OTF’s Resilient Communities Fund: Grants available for 2022

The Ontario Trillium Foundation supports non-profit organizations as they continue to recover and build resiliency due to impacts of COVID-19. The impacts of COVID-19 remain at the forefront of the sectors’ ability to build resiliency and support communities across Ontario. The non-profit sector continues to face many challenges, including how to adapt program and service delivery, meet changing community needs and address health and safety requirements. The Resilient Communities Fund supports the recovery efforts of organizations impacted by COVID-19 and helps them respond with immediate, medium, and long-term recovery projects. Grants support projects that help rebuild an organization’s capacity, enhance their resiliency, and meet the changing needs of their communities. Projects should be focused on: developing new approaches; starting new activities; adjusting strategies; or planning for future challenges. Request between $10,000 and $200,000, with a maximum of $100,000 per year. Grants can be up to 24 months in length. Application period is from March 9 until April 6, 2022 at 5 PM...

Truth and Reconciliation in Your Library – Implementation, Part 1

CFLA’s Truth & Reconciliation Committee was organized by utilizing and adapting the medicine wheel framework. This was chosen as the framework through which the Indigenous worldview can be understood. The Committee was divided into four teams with the following responsibilities: The Black Team compiled Best Practices already in existence related to Indigenous peoples of Canada. The White team provided a gap analysis on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Calls to Action and recommends an annual review be to evaluate progress. The Yellow team looked at existing relationships and developed a contact database. Finally, the Red Team envisioned the future by reviewing the existing body of knowledge related to the decolonization of space, access and classification, Indigenous knowledge protection, outreach and service. Information on the medicine wheel used can be found at the Turtle Lodge Journey of the Human Spirit. We will be focusing on the recommendations made by the White Team, which reports on actions which libraries are or should respond to. After a process of identification, analysis and prioritization Team White identified: • Activities for 72 of the 94 Calls to Action (76.5%) • 174 Activities were suggested based on current or potential good practice • This good practice can be either Direct Delivery or Supporting the delivery of the Calls to Action (included in Appendix – White Chapter) • For 46 of the 94 Calls to Action (48.9%) a priority was identified for library services Each Call to Action will be identified with it’s relevant recommendation. The following are Priority Level 1 Recommendations which should be adopted immediately. Call to Action #10 We call on the...

Truth and Reconciliation in Your Library

FOPL’s Indigenous Library Partnership Working Group has formally endorsed and recommends the CFLA’s Truth and Reconciliation Report and Recommendations. This report was published by CFLA’s Truth and Reconciliation Committee which exists to promote initiatives in all types of libraries to advance reconciliation by supporting the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action, and to promote collaboration in these issues across the Canadian library community. The report details 10 overarching recommendations for public libraries of the 94 Calls to Action that can be implemented. The following recommendations were made to the CFLA by the CFLA Truth and Reconciliation Committee and can be adapted to our public libraries as well: 1. As CFLA-FCAB is a national voice with the ability to influence national and international policy regarding issues of importance, we request the CFLA-FCAB create a permanent Standing Committee on Indigenous Matters utilizing the medicine wheel framework developed by the Truth & Reconciliation Committee; 2. The T&R Committee supports and endorses the CFLA-FCAB Position Statement on Library and Literacy Services for Indigenous (First Nations, Métis and Inuit) Peoples of Canada; 3. Encourage libraries, archives and cultural memory institutions to implement the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada 94 Calls to Action, several of which have been identified as having a direct impact on libraries and archives and are prioritized in this report, and to implement a status report on a yearly basis to monitor their implementation; 4. Ensure accessibility moving forward by continually reminding stakeholders that material produced and programming planned in the future should be accessible to all Canadians. CELA (the Center for Equitable Library Access) and NNELS (the National Network...

CFLA Position Statement on Intellectual Freedom / Énoncé sur la liberté intellectuelle de la CFAB

Le français suit As you may be aware, there has been much in the news as of late, especially in the USA, regarding censorship in schools. It appears as though there have been some regressions here by way of intellectual freedom. The Canadian Federation of Library Associations has published an official statement, developed by the Intellectual Freedom Committee and approved by the Board of Directors on January 7, 2022. It provides valuable guidance by interpreting our Statement on Intellectual Freedom and Libraries as it pertains to the question of the right to protest and dissent regarding library materials and other forms of expression. https://fopl.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/2022-01-18-Position-on-Protest-and-Disagreement-EN.docx.pdf La FCAB-CFLA est ravie de partager avec vous notre énoncé de position le plus récent, développé par la Comité sur la liberté intellectuelle et approuvé par le Conseil d’administration le 7 janvier. Cet énoncé fournit de précieux conseils en interprétant notre Énoncé sur la liberté intellectuelle et les bibliothèques en ce qui a trait au droits de protestations et de désaccords concernant les collections et autres formes d’expression dans les bibliothèques....

Support for Official Languages in Canadian Libraries / Étude des mesures provinciales et territoriales encadrant les langues officielles dans les bibliothèques au Canada

Le français suit A message from our friends at Library and Archives Canada: Subject : Report on Provincial and Territorial Measures to Support Official Languages in Libraries in Canada Dear colleagues, I want to inform you of the publication of the report, entitled Study of Provincial and Territorial Measures to Support Official Languages in Libraries in Canada. As you know, libraries are certainly among the most present institutions in our diverse Canadian communities. It is also the case for Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs). Yet, as Commissioner of Official Languages Raymond Théberge stated in May 2021, while “our expectations of the resources and services that libraries provide are also evolving,” “aspects of heritage and libraries as indices of vitality have not been considered in the same way as demographic and geographic indices, for example.” In order to fill this gap, Library and Archives Canada’s (LAC) Network of Official Language Minority Libraries (OLMC), which brings together libraries and librarians working in these communities, identified as a priority the need to examine how official languages issues in libraries are addressed across Canada. More specifically, the research aimed to identify the various legislative, regulatory and policy measures – including strategic orientation documents- that affect public libraries, while also taking a look at academic and community libraries. With this support, LAC launched the research project, respecting existing jurisdictions but with the hope of fostering best practices across the country. In the end, the report, written by Alain Roy, consists of two parts: Part 1: an overview, which presents the main features of the study and the findings proposed by the committee of experts who...

Another Push for Fair E-Book Pricing

The pandemic has our communities consuming e-books and e-audiobooks at a record pace. But many publishers highly inflate prices for e-books or won’t sell to libraries at all; which of course means that not everyone has the same access to information through their local public library. Librarians in Massachusetts have had enough and are teaming up with lawmakers to demand a new deal for libraries: https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/12/31/business/libraries-demand-new-deal-ebooks/...

Webinar: Library Engagement in a Pandemic & Post Pandemic Virtual World

Dalhousie–Horrocks National Leadership Lecture: Library Engagement in a Pandemic & Post Pandemic Virtual World  – Dr. Carla Hayden February 1st at 12:00 PM AST.Bio: Dr. Carla Hayden was sworn in as the 14th Librarian of Congress on September 14, 2016. Hayden, the first woman and the first African American to lead the national library, was nominated to the position by President Barack Obama on February 24, 2015, and her nominations was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on July 13. Prior to her latest post she served, since 1993, as CEO of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, Maryland. Hayden was nominated by President Obama to be a member of the National Museum and Library Services Board in January 2010 and was confirmed to that post by the Senate in June 2010. Prior to joining the Pratt Library, Hayden was deputy commissioner and chief librarian of the Chicago Public Library from 1991 to 1993. She was an assistant professor for the Library and Information Science at the University of Pittsburgh from 1987 to 1991. Hayden was library services coordinator for the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago from 1982 to 1987. She began her career with the Chicago Public Library as the young adult services coordinator from 1979 to 1982 and as library associate and children’s librarian from 1973 to 1979. Hayden was president of the American Library Association from 2003 to 2004. In 1995, she was the first African American to receive Library Journal’s Librarian of the Year Award in recognition of her outreach services at the Pratt Library, which included an after-school center for Baltimore teens offering homework assistance and college...

Contribute to AMO and Municipal World

Municipal World recently formed a partnership with the Association of Municipalities of Ontario to create a new resource. The Municipal Knowledge Portal will help municipalities find and share documents like by-laws, policies, reports, and more – all in one convenient location. In the spirit of collaboration that thrives in the municipal sector, they are currently looking for contributions in the following areas: Climate Change and Green Operations Human Resources Diversity and Inclusion Parks and Recreation To contribute, please email erica@municipalworld.com with the subject heading “Municipal Knowlege Portal – documents to...

Libraries Supporting Economic Development

Le français suit In today’s post-pandemic climate, the Ontario government is focused on economic recovery and development. Have you ever considered how your library contributes to that development? An interesting case for advocacy: libraries support small and local business, impact literacy rates which are intrinsically tied to economic development, provide services for the disables, contribute to ongoing education for skills upgrading, and more. Read more here: https://blog.pressreader.com/libraries-institutions/role-libraries-play-in-economic-development   Dans le climat post-pandémique d’aujourd’hui, le gouvernement de l’Ontario met l’accent sur la reprise économique et le développement. Avez-vous déjà réfléchi à la façon dont votre bibliothèque contribue à ce développement? Un argument intéressant en faveur du plaidoyer : les bibliothèques soutiennent les petites entreprises et les entreprises locales, ont un impact sur les taux d’alphabétisation qui sont intrinsèquement liés au développement économique, fournissent des services aux personnes handicapées, contribuent à la formation continue pour l’amélioration des compétences, et plus encore. Pour en savoir plus, lisez-le ici (en anglais seulement) :...

LAC Funding Opportunity for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation Organizations

Listen, Hear Our Voices is an initiative to support Indigenous nations, governments and non-profit organizations in their efforts to: digitize existing documentary heritage related to Indigenous languages and cultures; and build the skills, knowledge and resources required to carry out this work in their communities. Program staff are available for advice and support on Listen, Hear Our Voices funding applications. To find out more or to apply, visit the Library and Archives Canada website, here:...