CFLA Budget Communique

190322_CFLA-FCAB)Federal_Budget_communique [FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE] Libraries support budget initiatives to improve accessibility, provide new resources for Canadians with print disabilities, and support Indigenous languages March 22, 2019—OTTAWA The Canadian Federation of Library Associations/Fédération canadienne des associations de bibliothèques (CFLA-FCAB) is applauding the federal government’s commitment to invest in equitable library access. CFLA-FCAB had called on the government to make targeted investments that will help libraries provide books in formats that are fully accessible for all Canadians. Measures announced March 19th will help Canada’s library community achieve the long-term goal of universal access to knowledge. “Canadians with print disabilities currently have access to less than 10% of published works and Indigenous communities have less than 5%. This has placed the print disabled community at a disadvantage for far too long,” said Alix-Rae Stefanko, Chair of CFLAFCAB and a youth services librarian at Winnipeg Public Library. “We are very pleased that the government has committed to supporting the production and delivery of accessible formats, this is an important step to creating an inclusive publishing environment in Canada.” The Budget announced $3 million in the current fiscal year would be given to the Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) to produce new accessible reading materials to be made available at Canada’s public libraries. It also committed to a strategy that will support the production and distribution of accessible reading materials through publishing incentives. Canada’s independent publishing industry will receive $22.8 million over 5 years to increase production of accessible books for persons with print disabilities. “We were also pleased to see government’s support for preserving, promoting, and revitalizing Indigenous languages.” added Stefanko “The...

Three Things To Remember When Data Findings Are Difficult To See

This a great opinion piece: Three Things To Remember When Data Findings Are Difficult To See Three Things To Remember When Data Findings Are Difficult To See Intro teaser: “Two interesting things inevitably happen when an organization becomes audience-centric and data-informed: First, happily, an organization starts to get an accurate grasp on the things they do well. As a sector, some of our superpowers include securing public trust, providing academic advantages for children, and creating meaningful moments of connection. This information can result in a terrific boost! Second, less happily, an organization realizes what they haven’t been doing so well. Helpful data shines a light on so-called effective strategies that have actually been hurting the organization long-term – sometimes for years! Being shown with numbers that you’ve been making some bad guesses? That can be empowering, enlightening, invigorating…and very uncomfortable. One of the biggest hold ups for evolution of organizations can be the defenses that arise when data suggests that – for years – an organization has been doing something “wrong.” In some cases, these problems are instinctual, ill-informed “best practices” within the industry (such as misunderstanding how discounting really impacts visitation, or thinking expensive building expansions permanently increase attendance, to name just a couple). In other cases, they’re the result of individual cognitive biases among leaders. One of the most difficult situations an organization may face in the journey to become a data-driven entity is when findings suggest that the solutions that leaders championed for years may be causing more harm than good – and you’re a leader who championed them. To make matters worse, the cut-and-dry nature of charts can make findings feel less like opportunities for growth, and more like personal...

REASONS TO LOVE YOUR LIBRARY: THINK OF THEM AS “RESILIENCE CENTERS”

REASONS TO LOVE YOUR LIBRARY: THINK OF THEM AS “RESILIENCE CENTERS” https://catalystmagazine.net/reasons-to-love-your-library-think-of-them-as-resilience-centers/ “In his book Palaces for the People, sociologist Eric Klinenberg describes how a group of planners met to discuss ways to restore resiliency to 21st century cities. Someone proposed a compelling idea for a “resilience center”—a place that would be a community gathering place, open every day, welcoming to everyone, staffed by trained professionals, with flexible space that could be adapted for many uses. Klinenberg realized that most American communities already have such a place and that it’s called a branch library. Essential in time of crisis The importance of libraries for community resilience was demonstrated in November 2018 when the massive Camp Fire in Butte County California destroyed the town of Paradise. Before the fire was extinguished it burned 153,336 acres and 18,804 structures; tens of thousands of people were forced to evacuate and 85 people died. In the aftermath of the blaze, American Libraries magazine reported that branches of the Butte County Library system had become disaster information centers offering computers, wi-fi and printers to help displaced people contact their insurance agents and get help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Miraculously, the Paradise library was still standing in the blackened rubble. In an NPR Interview, Jody Jones, the mayor of Paradise, talked optimistically about re-building: “We still have a high school,” she said, “We still have a hospital, a library, a town hall.” Before Hurricane Katrina, libraries were treated by FEMA as non-essential services, but after Louisiana libraries played a significant role in disaster recovery, there was pressure to change federal law. Since 2011,...

Rogers Media sells Maclean’s, Chatelaine and other magazines to Toronto Life publisher

Rogers Media sells Maclean’s, Chatelaine and other magazines to Toronto Life publisher Deal for undisclosed sum is expected to close in April https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/rogers-media-magazines-1.5064054 “Rogers Media has struck a deal with the company that publishes Toronto Life to sell the company’s remaining magazine brands for an undisclosed sum. In a press release Wednesday, Rogers and St. Joseph Communications say Maclean’s, the English and French versions of Chatelaine, Today’s Parent, HELLO! Canada, along with digital publications FLARE and Canadian Business, for an undisclosed sum. “All current Rogers Media Publishing employees will be offered employment through the deal, which is expected to close in April 2019,” the release said. Once the biggest magazine publisher in Canada by far, Rogers has been slowly reducing its print footprint since about 2016, when it phased back publication of some titles, and stopped producing others altogether while laying off staff. From 2018: Rogers Media cuts 75 more jobs from digital content team The company has reportedly been in negotiations to get out of the magazine business entirely for the past year or so, and last fall they sold off the former print magazine and current digital portal MoneySense to fintech company Ratehub Inc. St Joseph’s media calls itself Canada’s biggest privately owned print, media and communications company, and their best known product is the magazine Toronto Life. They also own FASHION Magazine, Weddingbells, MARIAGE Québec, Ottawa Magazine, Quill & Quire and other titles. The company says it plans to develop and grow the magazine brands “that Canadians have come to know and love.” “Our experience with brands such as Toronto Life, and the strategies applied and growth we have seen there, gives us confidence that we can help transform these brands so they may...

Regional Workshops on Public Library Governance Best Practices

Regional Workshops on Governance Best Practices https://www2.librarygovernance.ca/gov-hub#four Southern Ontario Public Library Boards (Please see below for information regarding Public Library Boards in Northern Ontario) In April and May 2019, SOLS staff will provide in-person governance workshops at several locations throughout southern Ontario. These workshops will highlight governance best practices and will be aimed at board members and CEOs attending together!   These 3-hour sessions are an excellent opportunity for new and returning board members and CEOs to learn about boardroom practices that support informed decision-making and strategic oversight. The sessions will be interactive, with lots of time for networking, as well as time to have a valuable discussion as a board, weighing and sifting new approaches to doing things, and looking for ways to improve board functioning and decision-making.  The location of the workshops is based on the geographical areas of the Trustee Councils. For the most part, there are two meeting locations for each of the eight Trustee Councils. Boards and CEOs are welcome to a workshop at the location that is most convenient. Please note a LearnHQ account is required to register. Each individual participant must register for the workshops. For any inquiries, please email support@learnhq.ca or fill out the support form. Location Date Time Registration Guelph Public Library Main Branch 100 Norfolk St Guelph, ON N1H 4J6 Saturday, April 6 10am to 1pm REGISTER London Public Library Central Branch 251 Dundas St London, ON N6A 6H9 Saturday, April 13 10am to 1pm REGISTER Belleville Public Library 254 Pinnacle St Belleville, ON K8N 3B1 Saturday, April 13 10am to 1pm REGISTER Kingston Frontenac Public Library 130 Johnson St Kingston, ON K7L 1X8 Saturday, April 27...