Update on Canadian Federation of Library Associations (CFLA)

Update on Canadian Federation of Library Associations (CFLA) 25 Mar 2016 The Canadian Library Association has published an update on the creation of the Canadian Federation of Library Associations / Fédération canadienne des associations de bibliothèques (CFLA/FCAB): At the Canadian Library Association members meeting January 27, 2016, CLA members voted to dissolve the association. This decision was the result of a multi-year process that consulted with CLA members and the broader library community on a solution for an effective national voice for the Canadian library sector. The solution proposed is the creation of CFLA/FCAB. The vision and scope for this new organization is available in English and French. Since January, representatives from provincial, territorial, and national associations have been meeting weekly via teleconference to incorporate and create the new CFLA/FCAB. We are excited about this new opportunity for Canada’s library community, and we have a lot of work ahead of us! Much of our work to date has been somewhat internal in constructing a legal and corporate framework and foundation for the existence of CFLA/FCAB and includes the following tasks in progress: Drafting and reviewing by-laws and implementing the steps needed to incorporate Identifying an inaugural board tasked with setting up the new organization (see below) Securing member dues and setting up a financial framework Hiring initial contract support to bring CFLA to operational readiness Liaising with CLA to steward any CLA initiatives that are within the scope of this new organization The following people have stepped up to be on the initial board of directors. These folks are tasked with oversight of CFLA/FCAB until the first elected board of...

Public Libraries in the United States Survey

Public Libraries in the United States Survey Research by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) found shifts in Americans’ interaction with public libraries’ materials, programs and services in Fiscal Year 2013. The survey report describes findings from public libraries in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. With the available survey data, the report provides aggregated local, state and national information about the nation’s 9,000 public libraries and their 16,500 branches and bookmobiles....

eBook Pricing Campaign

Hello eBook Pricing Campaign members, We are seeing great response to our campaign to date!  More than 20,000 visits have been logged to the campaign website and the story has been picked up many times by prominent media outlets including CBC, The Toronto Star, and TVO. In fact, you may have heard that the Canadian Fair eBook Pricing campaign was named as a finalist for the PR News NonProfit PR Award in the “PR on a shoestring budget” Category. Kudos to TPL and OPL for great work! We’re hoping to build on this momentum and hope you’ll join us! Letters to Publishers In February 2016, an open letter was prepared and sent to multinational publishers requesting discussion of a proposed dual pricing model.  In this letter we praised Penguin RH’s direction in reducing eBook pricing for libraries and welcomed other multinational publishers to follow their direction.  A copy of  the letter is attached to this and will be linked to the campaign website next week.  Twitter Chat Social media has played a key role in the campaign so far.  To keep the dialogue going TPL, OPL, and EPL will be leading a twitter chat onThursday, March 31st from 12:30 – 1:30pm EST.  We will begin to publicize the chat on our respective Twitter feeds beginning on Tues, March 29. TPL will invite multinational publishers, media who covered the campaign, and library/other contacts to join the conversation. * We would really like to have an active and interesting discussion, and so are hoping that many of you will be available to participate. A social media calendar is attached to this email...

FOPL Federal Budget 2016 Analysis & Links

There was a lot to like in the 2016 Federal Budget speech announcements yesterday (March 22nd).  It was a budget heavy in support for municipalities, infrastructure, culture and First Nations communities.  Most initiatives are phased over 3-5 years. From a public library perspective the best news rests in the tangents and ripple effects.  Of particular note and expanded upon below are the following optimistic views: The strong additional funding for municipal infrastructure projects was strongly welcomed by mayors in Ontario and Canada.  The infrastructure deficit has been putting huge pressure on municipal budgets and consequently trickle down pressure on library funding. $3.4 billion over five years for social infrastructure, including affordable housing, early learning and child care, cultural and recreational infrastructure and community health care facilities all have obvious links to public library strategies and partnership opportunities.  Combined with recent funding announcements in the provincial budget in Ontario these initiatives go a long way to easing the pressure.  For the first time the Feds have offered funding for current in-process projects which was needed and provides employment right away without the planning and approvals lag.  Other strong hints for accessing federal funding if you’re planning new buildings is to review your approach to GREEN and LEED buildings as well as partnerships with Social Housing, Community centres, Cultural Centres and First Nations – wherever you can add value.  Follow the money and at least discuss it with your municipal colleagues. Funding for First Nations communities (Federal language seems to have changed to ‘indigenous’) is long overdue and may provide opportunities for partnerships for those public libraries which are contiguous with...

Federal Budget 2016 Documents

Budget 2016 Next   THE PDF VERSION 20165.88 MB To access a Portable Document Format (PDF) file you must have a PDF reader installed. If you do not already have such a reader, there are numerous PDF readers available for free download or for purchase on the Internet. Table of Contents A New Approach The Promise of Progress An Uncertain Future The Rise of Inequality Realizing Change Restoring Hope, Rewarding Hard Work Positioning Canada in a Shifting World Economy A Long-Term Plan for Growth Toward More Inclusive Growth Conclusion The Path Forward Introduction Global Economic Developments and Outlook Global Growth Has Slowed Financial Market Volatility Has Risen Commodity Prices Have Fallen Sharply Canada’s Economic Situation The Effect of Low Oil Prices on National Income, Investment and Employment Positive Developments Outside the Energy Sector The Conditions for More Robust Growth Going Forward Outstanding Risks to the Economic Outlook Canada’s Fiscal Strength Taking Action to Grow the Economy Economic Impacts of Measures A Responsible Approach to Fiscal Management A Responsible Return to Balanced Budgets Repealing the Federal Balanced Budget Act Chapter 1 – Help for the Middle Class Introduction Strengthening the Middle Class Introducing the Canada Child Benefit How Canadian Families Will Benefit From the New Canada Child Benefit Eliminating Income Splitting for Couples With Children Eliminating the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit and the Children’s Arts Tax Credit Helping Young Canadians Succeed Making Post-Secondary Education More Affordable Enhancing Canada Student Grants Making Student Debt More Manageable Introducing a Flat-Rate Student Contribution Eliminating the Education Tax Credit and the Textbook Tax Credit Helping Youth Obtain Valuable Work Experience A Renewed Youth Employment Strategy Prime Minister’s Youth Council Youth Service Expert Panel on Youth Employment Increasing...