How to Write Content Better & Faster: 10 Secrets to Try Now

How to Write Content Better & Faster: 10 Secrets to Try Now https://www.searchenginejournal.com/content-writing-secrets/254055/ “1. Talk to Your Readers as If You Were Having a Conversation with Them 2. Make Transitions from Each Sentence & Paragraph Smooth 3. If You Are Copywriting, You’re Only as Good as the Content You Copy 4. Learn How to Write Kick-Ass Headlines 5. Layout Subheadings Before You Start to Write the Body 6. Write Eye-Catching Quotes, Images & Memes 7. Write Shorter Paragraphs & Sentences 8. Using Voice to Text Tools Helps Make Writing Easier 9. Write First, Then Edit 10. Use Tools to Edit the Content Practice to Develop Good Writing Habits”        ...

Work In Culture Study and Town Halls

Work In Culture (A project supported by the government of Ontario) is preparing to do a survey and town halls around Ontario.  We encourage libraries to attend. The upcoming roundtables are: Kingston- July 5th Ottawa- July 13th There will be additional ones (Thunder Bay, Owen Sound, Huntsville, Toronto, among others) confirmed into the Fall. Who are we? WorkInCulture’s mission is to support the people who work in the cultural sector through life-long career development and entrepreneurial and business skills training. Beyond our (very popular) Job Board, we also offer a wide range of skills development programming, training and resources in a number of formats. What is MakingItWork? MakingItWork is a major research project that’s designed to help us (and you) better understand the opportunities and challenges of employment in the creative sector. Whether it’s through a survey or through participation in our community roundtables, we want to hear how you’re making it work, as well as find out what types of obstacles, challenges and opportunities exist for you as a creator, a cultural sector worker and/or employer. From librarians to visual artists to freelance arts administrators, not-for-profits and companies, we want you to tell us your story. Who is MakingItWork for? It’s for everyone and anyone who works in the arts, culture, heritage and library sector in Ontario. It covers individual artists and cultural workers to non-profit and for-profit employers in the sector. It covers freelancers, the self-employed and anyone who is trying to make it in the broader cultural sector. How can you get involved? We’ll be launching an online survey in the coming months, and we’ll need...

LAC’s Annual Report 2017-2018: Who do we think we are?

There are many different elements that fit together to make up the identity of Library and Archives Canada.  Read LAC’s 2017-2018 Annual Report and discover answers to the question of “Who do we think we are? from the perspective of all of us who work here. Stuffed with facts, photos, and candid quotations from LAC archivists, librarians, digital technicians, curators, and multi-media experts, to name just a few, you will discover how varied the work of our national library and archives can be. Read about the global significance of the Marshall McLuhan archives, now registered with UNESCO’s Memory of the World. Find out how the records of First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities form a bridge of reconciliation between the past and the present. Learn about the action team behind the second LAC Preservation Centre, soon to be built to Net Carbon Zero standards. Discover why LAC librarians see themselves as detectives, sailors, ninjas and even superheroes! These are just some of the highlights from another memorable year at LAC. To find out more about the key achievements of LAC in 2017-2018, and the people behind them, check out the 2017-2018 Annual Report, Who do we think we are? And at the same time, get to know yourselves better as Canadians, through the rich documentary heritage we acquire, process, preserve and make accessible to all. http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/news/Pages/2018/annual-report-2017-2018.aspx...

Survey on the state of digitization activities in Ontario public libraries

This email is being forwarded to all public libraries in Ontario on behalf of OurDigitalWorld. Please contact Allana (email below) at ODW directly of you have questions. Apologies for cross posting. ————————————————————————————————————————— This survey is on the state of digitization activities in Ontario public libraries. This research is being undertaken by OurDigitalWorld, a non-profit that works with libraries, archives, and heritage groups to digitize and make available their unique historical collections. Southern Ontario Library Service are partnering with us on this research. We’re collecting this information to get an up-to-date snapshot on how Ontario’s public libraries are approaching digitization work – their tools, capacity, experience, and obstacles. We will be publishing our findings and an edited, anonymized dataset. Every public library in Ontario is invited to submit a response to this survey, even if you have never done digitization and don’t intend to. This survey should take 30 minutes to complete. Please submit your response by July 15th. Please coordinate with your coworkers on who is in the best position to answer questions about digitization and special collections. We are looking for one response per library. If you are in a large library system with more than one department doing separate digitization projects, please answer separately – there is a space to indicate which department you’re responding for. If you are unsure about how best to respond, please read over the questions in advance of submitting your answers. You may want to save a copy of this document to draft your answers. You can find the survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ON-PL-digitization There is more information about the survey at the link above. If you have any questions or need help, please contact:...

Culture represents 3.6 % of the Ontario economy and is growing

Useful fingertip factoid: Culture represents 3.6 % of the Ontario economy and is growing. Public Libraries are in the culture sector For comparative purposes, Manufacturing is about 4% of GDP in Canada and the auto industry is about 1%. “Ontario Ontario’s culture GDP rose 1.4% to $25.7 billion in 2016. This accounted for 3.5% of the total provincial economy. Sound recording (+11.9%) had the fastest growth of all the domains in Ontario. There were 269,082 culture jobs in Ontario in 2016. This was a 0.4% decrease from the previous year, compared with a 1.3% gain in total jobs for the provincial economy. Sport GDP totalled $2.8 billion in 2016, up 3.7% from the previous year. Sport jobs in Ontario increased 2.2% to 45,495.” Released: 2018-02-27 “Economic importance of culture and sport in Canada The Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators are timely estimates of the economic contribution of culture and sport in Canada. In 2016, culture gross domestic product (GDP) and sport GDP combined for a total of $60.3 billion and equated to over 765,000 jobs in Canada. The largest contributors to culture GDP and jobs were the audio-visual and interactive media and the visual and applied arts domains, which include, among others, activities related to design, broadcasting, and film and video. For sport, the largest component was organized sport activities, including the hosting of sporting events. Culture GDP in Canada totalled $53.8 billion in 2016, a 1.5% increase from the previous year, while economy-wide GDPincreased 1.8%. Culture accounted for 2.8% of Canada’s overall GDP. The importance of culture varied considerably across provinces and territories, ranging from a share of 1.3% of GDP in Saskatchewan to 3.5% in Ontario. At the national level, culture GDP increased in most domains in 2016, led by sound recording (+7.3%). The only decrease was in the written and published works domain (-2.8%), which declined for the fourth...